TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Preservation of 5300 year old red blood cells in the Iceman

Janko, Marek and Stark, Robert W. and Zink, Albert (2012):
Preservation of 5300 year old red blood cells in the Iceman.
In: Journal of The Royal Society Interface, Royal Society Publishing, pp. 2581-2590, 9, (75), ISSN 1742-5689, [Online-Edition: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2012.0174],
[Article]

Abstract

Changes in elasticity and structures of red blood cells (RBCs) are important indicators of disease, and this makes them interesting for medical studies. In forensics, blood analyses represent a crucial part of crime scene investigations. For these reasons, the recovery and analysis of blood cells from ancient tissues is of major interest. In this study, we show that RBCs were preserved in Iceman tissue samples for more than 5000 years. The morphological and molecular composition of the blood corpuscle is verified by atomic force microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The cell size and shape approximated those of healthy, dried, recent RBCs. Raman spectra of the ancient corpuscle revealed bands that are characteristic of haemoglobin. Additional vibrational modes typical for other proteinaceous fragments, possibly fibrin, suggested the formation of a blood clot. The band intensities, however, were approximately an order of magnitude weaker than those of recent RBCs. This fact points to a decrease in the RBC-specific metalloprotein haemoglobin and, thus, to a degradation of the cells. Together, the results show the preservation of RBCs in the 5000 year old mummy tissue and give the first insights into their degradation

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2012
Creators: Janko, Marek and Stark, Robert W. and Zink, Albert
Title: Preservation of 5300 year old red blood cells in the Iceman
Language: English
Abstract:

Changes in elasticity and structures of red blood cells (RBCs) are important indicators of disease, and this makes them interesting for medical studies. In forensics, blood analyses represent a crucial part of crime scene investigations. For these reasons, the recovery and analysis of blood cells from ancient tissues is of major interest. In this study, we show that RBCs were preserved in Iceman tissue samples for more than 5000 years. The morphological and molecular composition of the blood corpuscle is verified by atomic force microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The cell size and shape approximated those of healthy, dried, recent RBCs. Raman spectra of the ancient corpuscle revealed bands that are characteristic of haemoglobin. Additional vibrational modes typical for other proteinaceous fragments, possibly fibrin, suggested the formation of a blood clot. The band intensities, however, were approximately an order of magnitude weaker than those of recent RBCs. This fact points to a decrease in the RBC-specific metalloprotein haemoglobin and, thus, to a degradation of the cells. Together, the results show the preservation of RBCs in the 5000 year old mummy tissue and give the first insights into their degradation

Journal or Publication Title: Journal of The Royal Society Interface
Volume: 9
Number: 75
Publisher: Royal Society Publishing
Uncontrolled Keywords: ancient erythrocytes, haemoglobin, protein degradation, Iceman, atomic force microscope, Raman spectroscopy
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Physics of Surfaces
Exzellenzinitiative
Exzellenzinitiative > Clusters of Excellence
Zentrale Einrichtungen
Exzellenzinitiative > Clusters of Excellence > Center of Smart Interfaces (CSI)
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2014 09:35
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2012.0174
Identification Number: doi:10.1098/rsif.2012.0174
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

View Item View Item