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Nanoscaled inorganic materials by molecular design

Riedel, Ralf (2012):
Nanoscaled inorganic materials by molecular design.
In: Chemical Society Reviews, 41 (15), pp. 5029-5031. RSC Publishing, ISSN 0306-0012,
[Article]

Abstract

In this special issue you will find a series of articles focused on inorganic nanomaterials synthesized by molecular precursors. The research studies reported here have been financially supported by the German Science Foundation (DFG), Bonn, Germany, in the frame of a so-called “Priority-Programme” SPP 1181 entitled “Nanoscaled Inorganic Materials by Molecular Design: New Materials for Advanced Technologies”. This research programme was funded between 2005 and 2011 with a total budget of €8 million. The interdisciplinary research team included natural scientists as well as mechanical engineers and was comprised of ca. 30 principal investigators from various German Universities working on more than ten different topics related to nanoscaled inorganic materials.

The aim of this priority programme was to develop concepts for the production of novel multifunctional inorganic materials with a tailor-made nanoscaled structure. Industrial demands on future technologies have created a need for new material properties which exceed by far those of materials known today and which can only be produced by designing the material structure at a nanoscale. Furthermore, the increasing miniaturisation of components calls for new process technologies allowing reliable production of materials at and below a micrometre scale. In particular inorganic-organic hybrid materials as well as amorphous and polycrystalline ceramics are to be used as material classes and produced by means of cross-linking routes in various states of condensation. In accordance with the so-called “bottom-up” approach, specific inorganic molecules are to be assigned to higher molecular networks and solid-state structures in the form of molecular nanotools by means of condensation and polymerisation processes. This method aims at linking organic components to inorganic structures producing materials inaccessible by thermodynamically controlled chemical syntheses. Therefore, the experimental studies were focused on the development of solids derived from molecular units via kinetically controlled synthesis processes in the interface between molecular and solid-state chemistry enabling specific adjustments to the solid-state properties. Thus, the ultimate objective of the priority programme was to systematically study the “bottom-up” approach with regard to the synthesis and exploration of novel materials in order to establish the technological fundamentals for the development of these new materials and their potential use. Possible fields of application for materials produced at a nanoscale are key technologies of the 21st century such as transport systems, information technology, energy as well as environmental systems and micro or nano electromechanical systems. The correlation between the structure of the molecular precursors and the nanostructure of the derived materials and their properties provided the focal point for the detailed experimental studies reported here.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2012
Creators: Riedel, Ralf
Title: Nanoscaled inorganic materials by molecular design
Language: English
Abstract:

In this special issue you will find a series of articles focused on inorganic nanomaterials synthesized by molecular precursors. The research studies reported here have been financially supported by the German Science Foundation (DFG), Bonn, Germany, in the frame of a so-called “Priority-Programme” SPP 1181 entitled “Nanoscaled Inorganic Materials by Molecular Design: New Materials for Advanced Technologies”. This research programme was funded between 2005 and 2011 with a total budget of €8 million. The interdisciplinary research team included natural scientists as well as mechanical engineers and was comprised of ca. 30 principal investigators from various German Universities working on more than ten different topics related to nanoscaled inorganic materials.

The aim of this priority programme was to develop concepts for the production of novel multifunctional inorganic materials with a tailor-made nanoscaled structure. Industrial demands on future technologies have created a need for new material properties which exceed by far those of materials known today and which can only be produced by designing the material structure at a nanoscale. Furthermore, the increasing miniaturisation of components calls for new process technologies allowing reliable production of materials at and below a micrometre scale. In particular inorganic-organic hybrid materials as well as amorphous and polycrystalline ceramics are to be used as material classes and produced by means of cross-linking routes in various states of condensation. In accordance with the so-called “bottom-up” approach, specific inorganic molecules are to be assigned to higher molecular networks and solid-state structures in the form of molecular nanotools by means of condensation and polymerisation processes. This method aims at linking organic components to inorganic structures producing materials inaccessible by thermodynamically controlled chemical syntheses. Therefore, the experimental studies were focused on the development of solids derived from molecular units via kinetically controlled synthesis processes in the interface between molecular and solid-state chemistry enabling specific adjustments to the solid-state properties. Thus, the ultimate objective of the priority programme was to systematically study the “bottom-up” approach with regard to the synthesis and exploration of novel materials in order to establish the technological fundamentals for the development of these new materials and their potential use. Possible fields of application for materials produced at a nanoscale are key technologies of the 21st century such as transport systems, information technology, energy as well as environmental systems and micro or nano electromechanical systems. The correlation between the structure of the molecular precursors and the nanostructure of the derived materials and their properties provided the focal point for the detailed experimental studies reported here.

Journal or Publication Title: Chemical Society Reviews
Journal volume: 41
Number: 15
Publisher: RSC Publishing
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Dispersive Solids
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2013 08:44
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c2cs90050e
Identification Number: doi:10.1039/c2cs90050e
Funders: I acknowledge the German Science Foundation for funding of the SPP 1181
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