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Hemodynamic signals correlate tightly with synchronized gamma oscillations.

Niessing, Jörn and Ebisch, Boris and Schmidt, Kerstin E. and Niessing, Michael and Singer, Wolf and Galuske, Ralf A. W. (2005):
Hemodynamic signals correlate tightly with synchronized gamma oscillations.
In: Science (New York, N.Y.), pp. 948-51, 309, (5736), ISSN 1095-9203, [Article]

Abstract

Functional imaging methods monitor neural activity by measuring hemodynamic signals. These are more closely related to local field potentials (LFPs) than to action potentials. We simultaneously recorded electrical and hemodynamic responses in the cat visual cortex. Increasing stimulus strength enhanced spiking activity, high-frequency LFP oscillations, and hemodynamic responses. With constant stimulus intensity, the hemodynamic response fluctuated; these fluctuations were only loosely related to action potential frequency but tightly correlated to the power of LFP oscillations in the gamma range. These oscillations increase with the synchrony of synaptic events, which suggests a close correlation between hemodynamic responses and neuronal synchronization.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2005
Creators: Niessing, Jörn and Ebisch, Boris and Schmidt, Kerstin E. and Niessing, Michael and Singer, Wolf and Galuske, Ralf A. W.
Title: Hemodynamic signals correlate tightly with synchronized gamma oscillations.
Language: English
Abstract:

Functional imaging methods monitor neural activity by measuring hemodynamic signals. These are more closely related to local field potentials (LFPs) than to action potentials. We simultaneously recorded electrical and hemodynamic responses in the cat visual cortex. Increasing stimulus strength enhanced spiking activity, high-frequency LFP oscillations, and hemodynamic responses. With constant stimulus intensity, the hemodynamic response fluctuated; these fluctuations were only loosely related to action potential frequency but tightly correlated to the power of LFP oscillations in the gamma range. These oscillations increase with the synchrony of synaptic events, which suggests a close correlation between hemodynamic responses and neuronal synchronization.

Journal or Publication Title: Science (New York, N.Y.)
Volume: 309
Number: 5736
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology > Systems Neurophysiology
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10 Department of Biology
Date Deposited: 21 Feb 2012 13:32
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