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Quantitative development and molecular forms of acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase during morphogenesis and synaptogenesis of chick brain and retina.

Layer, Paul G. ; Alber, R. ; Sporns, O. :
Quantitative development and molecular forms of acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase during morphogenesis and synaptogenesis of chick brain and retina.
In: Journal of neurochemistry, 49 (1) pp. 175-82. ISSN 0022-3042
[Artikel], (1987)

Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract)

The embryonic development of total specific activities as well as of molecular forms of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) and of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8) have been studied in the chick brain. A comparison of the development in different brain parts shows that cholinesterases first develop in diencephalon, then in tectum and telencephalon; cholinesterase development in retina is delayed by about 2-3 days; and the development in rhombencephalon [not studied until embryonic day 6 (E6)] and cerebellum is last. Both enzymes show complex and independent developmental patterns. During the early period (E3-E7) first BChE expresses high specific activities that decline rapidly, but in contrast AChE increases more or less constantly with a short temporal delay. Thereafter the developmental courses approach a late phase (E14-E20), during which AChE reaches very high specific activities and BChE follows at much lower but about parallel levels. By extraction of tissues from brain and retina in high salt plus 1% Triton X-100, we find that both cholinesterases are present in two major molecular forms, AChE sedimenting at 5.9S and 11.6S (corresponding to G2 and G4 globular forms) and BChE at 2.9S and 10.3S (G1 and G4, globular). During development there is a continuous increase of G4 over G2 AChE, the G4 form reaching 80% in brain but only 30% in retina. The proportion of G1 BChE in brain remains almost constant at 55%, but in retina there is a drastic shift from 65% G1 before E5 to 70% G4 form at E7.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Typ des Eintrags: Artikel
Erschienen: 1987
Autor(en): Layer, Paul G. ; Alber, R. ; Sporns, O.
Titel: Quantitative development and molecular forms of acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase during morphogenesis and synaptogenesis of chick brain and retina.
Sprache: Englisch
Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract):

The embryonic development of total specific activities as well as of molecular forms of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) and of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8) have been studied in the chick brain. A comparison of the development in different brain parts shows that cholinesterases first develop in diencephalon, then in tectum and telencephalon; cholinesterase development in retina is delayed by about 2-3 days; and the development in rhombencephalon [not studied until embryonic day 6 (E6)] and cerebellum is last. Both enzymes show complex and independent developmental patterns. During the early period (E3-E7) first BChE expresses high specific activities that decline rapidly, but in contrast AChE increases more or less constantly with a short temporal delay. Thereafter the developmental courses approach a late phase (E14-E20), during which AChE reaches very high specific activities and BChE follows at much lower but about parallel levels. By extraction of tissues from brain and retina in high salt plus 1% Triton X-100, we find that both cholinesterases are present in two major molecular forms, AChE sedimenting at 5.9S and 11.6S (corresponding to G2 and G4 globular forms) and BChE at 2.9S and 10.3S (G1 and G4, globular). During development there is a continuous increase of G4 over G2 AChE, the G4 form reaching 80% in brain but only 30% in retina. The proportion of G1 BChE in brain remains almost constant at 55%, but in retina there is a drastic shift from 65% G1 before E5 to 70% G4 form at E7.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Titel der Zeitschrift, Zeitung oder Schriftenreihe: Journal of neurochemistry
Band: 49
(Heft-)Nummer: 1
Fachbereich(e)/-gebiet(e): Fachbereich Biologie, Biology
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Fachbereich Biologie, Biology > Entwicklungsbiologie und Neurogenetik, Developmental Biology and Neurogenetics
Hinterlegungsdatum: 21 Nov 2011 13:33
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