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Restoration of phototropic responsiveness in decapitated maize coleoptiles.

Kaldenhoff, Ralf and Iino, M. (1997):
Restoration of phototropic responsiveness in decapitated maize coleoptiles.
In: Plant physiology, pp. 1267-72, 114, (4), ISSN 0032-0889, [Article]

Abstract

The literature indicates that the tip of maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles has the localized functions of producing auxin for growth and perceiving unilateral light stimuli and translocating auxin laterally for phototropism. There is evidence that the auxinproducing function of the tip is restored in decapitated coleoptiles. We examined whether the functions for phototropism are also restored by using blue-light conditions that induced a first pulse-induced positive phototropism (fPIPP) and a time-dependent phototropism (TDP). When the apical 5 mm, in which photosensing predominantly takes place, was removed, no detectable fPIPP occurred even if indole-3-acetic acid (lanolin mixture) was applied to the cut end. However, when the blue-light stimulation was delayed after decapitation, fPIPP became inducible in the coleoptile stumps supplied with indole-3-acetic-acid/lanolin (0.01 mg g-1), indicating that phototropic responsiveness was restored. This restoration progressed 1 to 2 h after decapitation, and the curvature response became comparable to that of intact coleoptiles. The results for TDP were qualitatively similar, but some quantitative differences were observed. It appeared that the overall TDP was based on a major photosensing mechanism specific to the tip and on at least one additional mechanism not specific to the tip, and that the tip-specific TDP was restored in decapitated coleoptiles with kinetics similar to that for fPIPP. It is suggested that the photoreceptor system, which accounts for fPIPP and a substantial part of TDP, is regenerated in decapitated coleoptiles, perhaps together with the mechanism for lateral auxin translocation.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 1997
Creators: Kaldenhoff, Ralf and Iino, M.
Title: Restoration of phototropic responsiveness in decapitated maize coleoptiles.
Language: English
Abstract:

The literature indicates that the tip of maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles has the localized functions of producing auxin for growth and perceiving unilateral light stimuli and translocating auxin laterally for phototropism. There is evidence that the auxinproducing function of the tip is restored in decapitated coleoptiles. We examined whether the functions for phototropism are also restored by using blue-light conditions that induced a first pulse-induced positive phototropism (fPIPP) and a time-dependent phototropism (TDP). When the apical 5 mm, in which photosensing predominantly takes place, was removed, no detectable fPIPP occurred even if indole-3-acetic acid (lanolin mixture) was applied to the cut end. However, when the blue-light stimulation was delayed after decapitation, fPIPP became inducible in the coleoptile stumps supplied with indole-3-acetic-acid/lanolin (0.01 mg g-1), indicating that phototropic responsiveness was restored. This restoration progressed 1 to 2 h after decapitation, and the curvature response became comparable to that of intact coleoptiles. The results for TDP were qualitatively similar, but some quantitative differences were observed. It appeared that the overall TDP was based on a major photosensing mechanism specific to the tip and on at least one additional mechanism not specific to the tip, and that the tip-specific TDP was restored in decapitated coleoptiles with kinetics similar to that for fPIPP. It is suggested that the photoreceptor system, which accounts for fPIPP and a substantial part of TDP, is regenerated in decapitated coleoptiles, perhaps together with the mechanism for lateral auxin translocation.

Journal or Publication Title: Plant physiology
Volume: 114
Number: 4
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology > Applied Plant Sciences
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10 Department of Biology
Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2011 13:12
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