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Conflict Resolution in Autonomous Operations Area Airspace

Barraci, Nima (2010):
Conflict Resolution in Autonomous Operations Area Airspace.
München, Hut, Institut für Flugsysteme und Regelungstechnik, TU Darmstadt, [Online-Edition: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/2369/1/Conflict%20Resol...],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

A paradigm shift is at hand with the planned redesign of the Air Traffic Management and Air Traffic Control systems. The concept for the future air traffic system foresees that aircraft will monitor and maintain separation to each other by themselves in Autonomous Operations Area airspace. With this shift of responsibility for separation assurance from Air Traffic Control to the flight deck crews a more flexible and better airspace usage is expected. Furthermore, through the more flexible airspace usage, a gain in flight efficiency is also anticipated. In order to operate in this airspace area, aircraft are required to be equipped with a system enabling them to detect and resolve air traffic conflicts. Upon detection of a conflict with another aircraft, the system is expected to compute an alternative trajectory which guides the aircraft around the conflict and back to its original trajectory. The alternative trajectory needs to adhere to several requirements, such as being clear of conflicts and being flyable. Further requirements that are often stated are to minimise the additional fuel and time required for the resolution. This thesis is concerned with such a Conflict Detection & Resolution system. Primary focus lies on the resolution of air traffic conflicts while guaranteeing flyability and respecting the Cost Index. The Cost Index is nowadays used by the Flight Management System to optimise the flight profile in respect to the operators prioritisation of fuel-related to time-related costs. This paramter is included into the Conflict Resolution process which is based on Artificial Force Fields. Flyability of the trajectory is intended to be guaranteed through integration of a flight mechanics model. The algorithm devised in this work is validated in fast time simulations with varying Cost Index. Objects of study are the distance at the Closest Point of Approach, the integration of the Cost Index and the flyability of the resulting trajectory. The first two objects of this study will be validated through comparison of the original and updated trajectory. The new trajectory is considered conflict free if the distance at the Closest Point of Approach is sufficiently large. The lateral, vertical and temporal differences between the two trajectories are used as measures for time- and fuel-related costs. Flyability of the resulting trajectory is validated by confirming adherence to the flight envelope and the constraints given by the flight mechanics model used. The evaluation of the algorithm showed that by integration of a flight mechanics model flyability of the resulting trajectory could be assured. Regarding resolution of the conflicts, the algorithm could compute a trajectory which prevented the initially set up Mid-Air Collision between the aircraft. Though, the minimum required separation could not be achieved in all cases. The approach of integrating the Cost Index into the resolution process showed to be feasible, whereas especially regarding the speed resolution further enhancements have been found to be necessary.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2010
Creators: Barraci, Nima
Title: Conflict Resolution in Autonomous Operations Area Airspace
Language: English
Abstract:

A paradigm shift is at hand with the planned redesign of the Air Traffic Management and Air Traffic Control systems. The concept for the future air traffic system foresees that aircraft will monitor and maintain separation to each other by themselves in Autonomous Operations Area airspace. With this shift of responsibility for separation assurance from Air Traffic Control to the flight deck crews a more flexible and better airspace usage is expected. Furthermore, through the more flexible airspace usage, a gain in flight efficiency is also anticipated. In order to operate in this airspace area, aircraft are required to be equipped with a system enabling them to detect and resolve air traffic conflicts. Upon detection of a conflict with another aircraft, the system is expected to compute an alternative trajectory which guides the aircraft around the conflict and back to its original trajectory. The alternative trajectory needs to adhere to several requirements, such as being clear of conflicts and being flyable. Further requirements that are often stated are to minimise the additional fuel and time required for the resolution. This thesis is concerned with such a Conflict Detection & Resolution system. Primary focus lies on the resolution of air traffic conflicts while guaranteeing flyability and respecting the Cost Index. The Cost Index is nowadays used by the Flight Management System to optimise the flight profile in respect to the operators prioritisation of fuel-related to time-related costs. This paramter is included into the Conflict Resolution process which is based on Artificial Force Fields. Flyability of the trajectory is intended to be guaranteed through integration of a flight mechanics model. The algorithm devised in this work is validated in fast time simulations with varying Cost Index. Objects of study are the distance at the Closest Point of Approach, the integration of the Cost Index and the flyability of the resulting trajectory. The first two objects of this study will be validated through comparison of the original and updated trajectory. The new trajectory is considered conflict free if the distance at the Closest Point of Approach is sufficiently large. The lateral, vertical and temporal differences between the two trajectories are used as measures for time- and fuel-related costs. Flyability of the resulting trajectory is validated by confirming adherence to the flight envelope and the constraints given by the flight mechanics model used. The evaluation of the algorithm showed that by integration of a flight mechanics model flyability of the resulting trajectory could be assured. Regarding resolution of the conflicts, the algorithm could compute a trajectory which prevented the initially set up Mid-Air Collision between the aircraft. Though, the minimum required separation could not be achieved in all cases. The approach of integrating the Cost Index into the resolution process showed to be feasible, whereas especially regarding the speed resolution further enhancements have been found to be necessary.

Place of Publication: München
Publisher: Hut
Divisions: 16 Department of Mechanical Engineering
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute of Flight Systems and Automatic Control (FSR)
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2011 13:14
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/2369/1/Conflict%20Resol...
Additional Information:

ISBN 978-3-86853-384-2

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