TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Plant aquaporin selectivity: where transport assays, computer simulations and physiology meet

Ludewig, Uwe and Dynowski, Marek :
Plant aquaporin selectivity: where transport assays, computer simulations and physiology meet.
In: Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS, 66 (19) pp. 3161-75. ISSN 1420-9071
[Article] , (2009)

Abstract

Plants contain a large number of aquaporins with different selectivity. These channels generally conduct water, but some additionally conduct NH(3), CO(2) and/or H(2)O(2). The experimental evidence and molecular basis for the transport of a given solute, the validation with molecular dynamics simulations and the physiological impact of the selectivity are reviewed here. The aromatic/arginine (ar/R) constriction is most important for solute selection, but the exact pore requirements for efficient conduction of small solutes remain difficult to predict. Yeast growth assays are valuable for screening substrate selectivity and are explicitly shown for hydrogen peroxide and methylamine, a transport analog of ammonia. Independent assays need to address the relevance of different substrates for each channel in its physiological context. This is emphasized by the fact that several plant NIP channels, which conduct several solutes, are specifically involved in the transport of metalloids, such as silicic acid, arsenite, or boric acid in planta.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2009
Creators: Ludewig, Uwe and Dynowski, Marek
Title: Plant aquaporin selectivity: where transport assays, computer simulations and physiology meet
Language: English
Abstract:

Plants contain a large number of aquaporins with different selectivity. These channels generally conduct water, but some additionally conduct NH(3), CO(2) and/or H(2)O(2). The experimental evidence and molecular basis for the transport of a given solute, the validation with molecular dynamics simulations and the physiological impact of the selectivity are reviewed here. The aromatic/arginine (ar/R) constriction is most important for solute selection, but the exact pore requirements for efficient conduction of small solutes remain difficult to predict. Yeast growth assays are valuable for screening substrate selectivity and are explicitly shown for hydrogen peroxide and methylamine, a transport analog of ammonia. Independent assays need to address the relevance of different substrates for each channel in its physiological context. This is emphasized by the fact that several plant NIP channels, which conduct several solutes, are specifically involved in the transport of metalloids, such as silicic acid, arsenite, or boric acid in planta.

Journal or Publication Title: Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS
Volume: 66
Number: 19
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology > Plant Nutrition and Biomass
?? fb10_botanik ??
10 Department of Biology
Date Deposited: 16 Mar 2010 13:08
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

View Item View Item