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Isotopic evidence (B, C, O) of deep fluid processes in fault rocks from the active Woodlark Basin detachment zone

Kopf, A. and Behrmann, J. H. and Deyhle, A. and Roller, S. and Nagel, T. (2003):
Isotopic evidence (B, C, O) of deep fluid processes in fault rocks from the active Woodlark Basin detachment zone.
In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Elsevier, pp. 51-68, 208, (1-2), [Online-Edition: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V...],
[Article]

Abstract

We report results from boron, carbon and oxygen stable isotope analyses of faulted and veined rocks recovered by scientific ocean drilling during ODP Leg 180 in the western Woodlark Basin, off Papua New Guinea. In this area of active continental extension, crustal break-up and incipient seafloor spreading, a shallow-dipping, seismically active detachment fault accommodates strain, defining a zone of mylonites and cataclasites, vein formation and fluid infiltration. Syntectonic microstructures and vein-fill mineralogy suggest frictional heating during slip during extension and exhumation of Moresby Seamount. Low carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of calcite veins indicate precipitation from hydrothermal fluids (δ13CPDB down to −17‰; δ18OPDB down to −22‰) formed by both dehydration and decarbonation. Boron contents are low (<7 ppm), indicating high-grade metamorphic source rock for the fluids. Some of the δ11B signatures (17–35‰; parent solutions to calcite vein fills) are low when compared to deep-seated waters in other tectonic environments, likely reflecting preferential loss of 11B during low-grade metamorphism at depth. Pervasive devolatilization and flux of CO2-rich fluids are evident from similar vein cement geochemistry in the detachment fault zone and splays further updip. Multiple rupture-and-healing history of the veins suggests that precipitation may be an important player in fluid pressure evolution and, hence, seismogenic fault movement.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2003
Creators: Kopf, A. and Behrmann, J. H. and Deyhle, A. and Roller, S. and Nagel, T.
Title: Isotopic evidence (B, C, O) of deep fluid processes in fault rocks from the active Woodlark Basin detachment zone
Language: English
Abstract:

We report results from boron, carbon and oxygen stable isotope analyses of faulted and veined rocks recovered by scientific ocean drilling during ODP Leg 180 in the western Woodlark Basin, off Papua New Guinea. In this area of active continental extension, crustal break-up and incipient seafloor spreading, a shallow-dipping, seismically active detachment fault accommodates strain, defining a zone of mylonites and cataclasites, vein formation and fluid infiltration. Syntectonic microstructures and vein-fill mineralogy suggest frictional heating during slip during extension and exhumation of Moresby Seamount. Low carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of calcite veins indicate precipitation from hydrothermal fluids (δ13CPDB down to −17‰; δ18OPDB down to −22‰) formed by both dehydration and decarbonation. Boron contents are low (<7 ppm), indicating high-grade metamorphic source rock for the fluids. Some of the δ11B signatures (17–35‰; parent solutions to calcite vein fills) are low when compared to deep-seated waters in other tectonic environments, likely reflecting preferential loss of 11B during low-grade metamorphism at depth. Pervasive devolatilization and flux of CO2-rich fluids are evident from similar vein cement geochemistry in the detachment fault zone and splays further updip. Multiple rupture-and-healing history of the veins suggests that precipitation may be an important player in fluid pressure evolution and, hence, seismogenic fault movement.

Journal or Publication Title: Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Volume: 208
Number: 1-2
Publisher: Elsevier
Uncontrolled Keywords: detachment faulting Woodlark Basin stable isotopes boron veins seismic slip
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Earth Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Earth Science > Applied Sedimentary Geology
Date Deposited: 28 Jan 2010 13:13
Official URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V...
Identification Number: doi:10.1016/S0012-821X(03)00016-5
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