TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Optimization and automation of the ligase cycling reaction

Schlichting, Niels Carsten (2021):
Optimization and automation of the ligase cycling reaction. (Publisher's Version)
Darmstadt, Technische Universität,
DOI: 10.26083/tuprints-00011303,
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

Modern approaches in the field of biology, especially the field of synthetic biology, are based on design-build-test-learn (DBTL)-cycles to, e.g., generate optimized genetic constructs for various applications. The overall speed of one cycle mainly depends on the ability to physically assemble DNA with a high efficiency in a short time period. This is achievable by automation approaches. Several automated DNA assemblies are described in the literature but are related to laborious in silico planning, are usually limiting the reusage of the DNA parts or are introducing scars into the final sequence. To overcome those restrictions and to enable a rapid automation, an easy-to-plan and scar-less assembly method has to be utilized. The ligase cycling reaction (LCR) is the most promising candidate and is the scope of this thesis. For the LCR, no construct specific DNA parts have to be designed and no scars are incorporated into the desired construct. Single-stranded bridges made of DNA (bridging oligos (BOs)) are utilized to specify the order of up to 20 parts in a one-pot reaction. A thermal cycling protocol enables the strand separation of the DNA parts, the annealing of the BOs and the in vitro ligation. The desired product is finally derived by transforming the LCR mixture into Escherichia coli (E. coli). Due to the benefits of this assembly technique, the LCR was already implemented from Robinson et al. on a robotic platform in 2018. According to the authors and the results presented in this thesis, the assembly efficiency for some LCR reactions is low. This issue is associated with a tremendously increased effort to obtain the desired sequence. The reasons for low efficiencies are determined within this thesis to optimize the LCR. Furthermore, an alternative in vitro method for the cumbersome in vivo approach is developed and is based on a cell-free system to screen for correctly assembled constructs. In the end, a workflow for an automated LCR is designed and initially validated on a robotic platform. Overall, up to ten DNA parts were assembled in a one-pot reaction by applying the LCR protocol described in the literature by de Kok et al. (2014). Nevertheless, some assemblies were not successful and an improved LCR assembly protocol was developed. In contrast to the literature, to omit the secondary structures inhibitors dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and betaine had tremendously increased the efficiency and the total number of colonies for the assembly of various plasmid designs. Furthermore, to shift the annealing temperature to the activity optimum of the utilized ligase was beneficial. The new LCR protocol was implemented in an automated assembly and plating workflow for a robotic platform to theoretically build 96 DNA constructs within 19 h and needs to be further validated. To support the automation process, a software for the BO design of combinatorial LCR assemblies was build. As an additional scope, an in vitro LCR method was designed and validated by using a cell-free system for the test-learn steps of the DBTL-cycles. In comparison to the automated in vivo workflow, ca. 5× more LCR assemblies are screenable within the same time frame of 19 h and the same hardware setup. In future, the optimized LCR protocol and the robotic workflow for the in vivo LCR can be adapted for the in vitro LCR approach and represents the method of choice for automated high-throughput DBTL-cycles of genetic switches and circuits.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2021
Creators: Schlichting, Niels Carsten
Status: Publisher's Version
Title: Optimization and automation of the ligase cycling reaction
Language: English
Abstract:

Modern approaches in the field of biology, especially the field of synthetic biology, are based on design-build-test-learn (DBTL)-cycles to, e.g., generate optimized genetic constructs for various applications. The overall speed of one cycle mainly depends on the ability to physically assemble DNA with a high efficiency in a short time period. This is achievable by automation approaches. Several automated DNA assemblies are described in the literature but are related to laborious in silico planning, are usually limiting the reusage of the DNA parts or are introducing scars into the final sequence. To overcome those restrictions and to enable a rapid automation, an easy-to-plan and scar-less assembly method has to be utilized. The ligase cycling reaction (LCR) is the most promising candidate and is the scope of this thesis. For the LCR, no construct specific DNA parts have to be designed and no scars are incorporated into the desired construct. Single-stranded bridges made of DNA (bridging oligos (BOs)) are utilized to specify the order of up to 20 parts in a one-pot reaction. A thermal cycling protocol enables the strand separation of the DNA parts, the annealing of the BOs and the in vitro ligation. The desired product is finally derived by transforming the LCR mixture into Escherichia coli (E. coli). Due to the benefits of this assembly technique, the LCR was already implemented from Robinson et al. on a robotic platform in 2018. According to the authors and the results presented in this thesis, the assembly efficiency for some LCR reactions is low. This issue is associated with a tremendously increased effort to obtain the desired sequence. The reasons for low efficiencies are determined within this thesis to optimize the LCR. Furthermore, an alternative in vitro method for the cumbersome in vivo approach is developed and is based on a cell-free system to screen for correctly assembled constructs. In the end, a workflow for an automated LCR is designed and initially validated on a robotic platform. Overall, up to ten DNA parts were assembled in a one-pot reaction by applying the LCR protocol described in the literature by de Kok et al. (2014). Nevertheless, some assemblies were not successful and an improved LCR assembly protocol was developed. In contrast to the literature, to omit the secondary structures inhibitors dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and betaine had tremendously increased the efficiency and the total number of colonies for the assembly of various plasmid designs. Furthermore, to shift the annealing temperature to the activity optimum of the utilized ligase was beneficial. The new LCR protocol was implemented in an automated assembly and plating workflow for a robotic platform to theoretically build 96 DNA constructs within 19 h and needs to be further validated. To support the automation process, a software for the BO design of combinatorial LCR assemblies was build. As an additional scope, an in vitro LCR method was designed and validated by using a cell-free system for the test-learn steps of the DBTL-cycles. In comparison to the automated in vivo workflow, ca. 5× more LCR assemblies are screenable within the same time frame of 19 h and the same hardware setup. In future, the optimized LCR protocol and the robotic workflow for the in vivo LCR can be adapted for the in vitro LCR approach and represents the method of choice for automated high-throughput DBTL-cycles of genetic switches and circuits.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Collation: XV, 160 Seiten
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology
10 Department of Biology > Computer-aided Synthetic Biology
LOEWE
LOEWE > LOEWE-Schwerpunkte
LOEWE > LOEWE-Schwerpunkte > CompuGene – Computer-assisted design methods for complex Genetic circuits
Date Deposited: 03 Mar 2021 11:56
DOI: 10.26083/tuprints-00011303
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/11303
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-113030
Referees: Kabisch, Prof. Dr. Johannes ; Süß, Prof. Dr. Beatrix
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 24 June 2020
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language

Im Feld der Biologie, und speziell in der Synthetischen Biologie, ist die Verwendung von sogenannten Design-Build-Test-Learn (DBTL)-Zyklen eine generelle Methodik um z. B. diverse genetische Konstrukte zu generieren und zu optimieren. Die Geschwindigkeit für solch einen DBTL-Zyklus ist hauptsächlich dadurch limitiert, inwiefern DNA Fragmente erfolgreich zu komplexeren Produkten assembliert werden können. Eine Möglichkeit dies zu gewährleisten ist die Automatisierung der DNA Assemblierung mit Hilfe von Robotik-Plattformen und wird zunehmend verwendet. Unglücklicherweise werden dafür weitestgehend Assemblierungsmethoden verwendet, die einen aufwändigen Planungsprozess benötigen, die Wiederverwendung der genutzten DNA Fragmente erschweren oder sogar genetische Narben in den Produkten hinterlassen. Eine Assemblierungsmethode, die alle drei genannten Limitationen umgeht, ist die Ligase Cycling Reaction (LCR) und wird daher in dieser Arbeit verwendet. Im Kontrast zu gängigen Assemblierungsmethoden müssen keine Konstrukt-spezifischen DNA Fragmente entwickelt werden. Zudem bleiben keine genetischen Narben in der finalen Sequenz zurück. Zur Festlegung der Assemblierungsreihenfolge werden einzelsträngige DNA Brücken, sogenannte Bridging Oligos (BOs), genutzt um bis zu 20 DNA Fragmente in einer Reaktion zu ligieren. Dazu wird der Mix aus Fragmenten, BOs und einer Ligase unter spezifischen Salzbedingungen zyklisiert erhitzt und abgekühlt um das Denaturieren der DNA Fragmente, das Hybridisieren der BOs mit den Fragment-Einzelsträngen sowie die Ligationsreaktion zu ermöglichen. Letztendlich wird das Produkt nach der Transformation von Escherichia coli (E. coli) mit der LCR erhalten. Somit ist die LCR eine Verkettung einer in vitro sowie in vivo Prozedur. Diese Methodik wurde bereits 2018 von Robinson et al. mit einer Robotik-Plattform automatisiert. Jedoch wurden teilweise niedrige Assemblierungseffizienzen erreicht was mit einem hohen zeitlichen und finanziellen Aufwand für das Identifizieren von korrekt assemblierten Konstrukten verbunden ist. Die Optimierung der LCR Reaktion und die darauffolgende Automatisierung mit Hilfe der Robotik-Plattform des CompuGene-Projektes ist der Fokus dieser Arbeit und soll die Reproduzierbarkeit, Robustheit und den Durchsatz von DNA-Assemblierungen verbessern. Zusätzlich wird eine in vitro LCR Methode entwickelt, um den in vivo Einfluss von E. coli auszuschließend und das limitierende Transformieren und Ausplattieren der in vivo LCR zum umgehen. Durch die Verwendung des publizierten LCR Protokolls von de Kok et al. (2014) konnten bis zu zehn DNA Fragmente in einer Reaktion erfolgreich assembliert werden. Jedoch waren manche Assemblierungen nicht erfolgreich oder die Effizienz der Reaktion war gering. Daher wurde ein verbessertes LCR Protokoll entwickelt: im Gegensatz zum ursprünglichen Protokoll erhöhte das Weglassen der Detergenzien Dimethylsulfoxid (DMSO) und Betain die Effizienz und die Anzahl der Transformanten. Dieser Einfluss konnte bei Assemblierungen verschiedener Plasmide gezeigt werden. Weiterhin führte eine Erhöhung der Annealing Temperatur zu verbesserten Ergebnissen bezüglich der Transformantenmenge. Das neue LCR Protokoll wurde anschließend verwendet um ein Protokoll für ein automatisiertes Assemblieren und Ausplattieren von 96 Konstrukten innerhalb von 19 h mit Hilfe der Robotik-Plattform zu ermöglichen. Dieser Prozess wurde im Trockenmodus entwickelt und erfordert noch eine Validierung. Um die Automatisierung weiterhin zu unterstützen, wurde zudem eine Software zur automatischen Erzeugung von BOs und von voll-kombinatorischen in silico LCRs entwickelt. Diese Software und der Robotik- Prozess der in vivo LCR bildet mitunter auch die Grundlage für die entwickelte in vitro LCR: basierend auf diesem zell-freien System könnten innerhalb von 19 h ca. 5× mehr LCR Reaktionen durchgeführt und analysiert werden als mit dem in vivo Ansatz. In Zukunft stellt die in vitro LCR die Methode der Wahl dar um automatisiert im Hochdurchsatz DBTL-Zyklen von genetischen Schaltern und Schaltkreisen durchzuführen.

German
Export:
Suche nach Titel in: TUfind oder in Google
Send an inquiry Send an inquiry

Options (only for editors)
Show editorial Details Show editorial Details