TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Bio-inspired Approaches for Human Locomotion: From Concepts to Applications

Zhao, Guoping (2020):
Bio-inspired Approaches for Human Locomotion: From Concepts to Applications.
Darmstadt, Technische Universität Darmstadt, DOI: 10.25534/tuprints-00011306,
[Online-Edition: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/11306],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

After millions of years of evolution, humans can achieve locomotion tasks in complex environments with versatile, robust and efficient bipedal gaits. Understanding human locomotion control systems can help us develop novel bio-inspired based methods for improving the current legged robots (e.g. humanoids) and wearable devices (e.g. prostheses, exoskeletons).

This thesis systematically explores the bio-inspired approaches from concepts to applications for further understanding human locomotion. It includes three main parts: biomechanical studies on human experiments, hardware implementations of bio-inspired concepts, and modeling of human locomotion.

The biomechanical studies provide insights on the human locomotor control systems. Human locomotion control can be separated into three locomotor subfunctions which are stance (axial leg function), swing (rotational leg function), and balance (posture control). We investigated how these subfunctions interact with each other by analyzing the contribution of stance and swing leg movements to the walking dynamics. The results reveal a coupling mechanism and synergistic interactions between the subfunctions. Further analyses on the human gait initiation (from standing to walking) experimental data demonstrate that the swing leg and stance leg functions are emerged during the first stride of the stance limb. And we find a strong correlation between the control of the frontal plane and the sagittal plane joints. All these results indicate that the support of one subfunction can provide benefits for the others.

Inspired by the findings from the previous biomechanical studies, we implemented bio-inspired balance control strategies on a lower-limb exoskeleton for human walking. The hardware implementations are used to validate and demonstrate the benefits of bio-inspired control concepts. The results show that the bio-inspired balance controller can not only support the swing and stance leg function but also reduce the metabolic costs and assist human walking. The results also support the prior biomechanical studies which suggest synergistic interactions between the subfunctions. In addition, we also implemented a bio-inspired neuromuscular reflex based controller for a hopping robot to investigate the potential benefits of the muscle properties for the stance (rebounding) leg function. The results demonstrate that the robot can achieve stable and robust hopping with the bio-inspired controller. Further analyses show that the neuromuscular properties play an important role in stabilizing the motion. These results indicate that gait models which include the muscle properties and reflex-like control could better reproduce human locomotion.

The modeling of human locomotion help us test the bio-inspired concepts in the simulation and reveal the key components of human locomotion control. Here, based on the previous findings, we developed a complex neuromuscular gait model to produce subject specific walking behaviors. Deep reinforcement learning methods were used to generate the control policy (sensor-motor mappings) which has similar functionality as human spinal cord neural circuitries. The results show that the model can achieve robust walking and closely reproduce human joint kinematics and muscle activations. In addition, we also found that the neuromuscular dynamics can facilitate the learning. In future, the proposed gait model can be used to identify optimal control schemes for wearable robots (e.g. prostheses, exoskeletons).

In summary, this thesis presents a systematic approach of investigating bio-inspired concepts for human locomotion by experimental studies of human gait, simulations, and hardware implementations. The main contribution of this work is demonstrating how the bio-inspired concepts are extracted from the human experimental data, tested with the simulation models, and implemented and validated with the hardware systems. The outcomes of this thesis can be used as a framework to develop novel bio-inspired controllers for improving the performance of legged robots (e.g. humanoids) and wearable robots (e.g. prostheses, exoskeletons).

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2020
Creators: Zhao, Guoping
Title: Bio-inspired Approaches for Human Locomotion: From Concepts to Applications
Language: English
Abstract:

After millions of years of evolution, humans can achieve locomotion tasks in complex environments with versatile, robust and efficient bipedal gaits. Understanding human locomotion control systems can help us develop novel bio-inspired based methods for improving the current legged robots (e.g. humanoids) and wearable devices (e.g. prostheses, exoskeletons).

This thesis systematically explores the bio-inspired approaches from concepts to applications for further understanding human locomotion. It includes three main parts: biomechanical studies on human experiments, hardware implementations of bio-inspired concepts, and modeling of human locomotion.

The biomechanical studies provide insights on the human locomotor control systems. Human locomotion control can be separated into three locomotor subfunctions which are stance (axial leg function), swing (rotational leg function), and balance (posture control). We investigated how these subfunctions interact with each other by analyzing the contribution of stance and swing leg movements to the walking dynamics. The results reveal a coupling mechanism and synergistic interactions between the subfunctions. Further analyses on the human gait initiation (from standing to walking) experimental data demonstrate that the swing leg and stance leg functions are emerged during the first stride of the stance limb. And we find a strong correlation between the control of the frontal plane and the sagittal plane joints. All these results indicate that the support of one subfunction can provide benefits for the others.

Inspired by the findings from the previous biomechanical studies, we implemented bio-inspired balance control strategies on a lower-limb exoskeleton for human walking. The hardware implementations are used to validate and demonstrate the benefits of bio-inspired control concepts. The results show that the bio-inspired balance controller can not only support the swing and stance leg function but also reduce the metabolic costs and assist human walking. The results also support the prior biomechanical studies which suggest synergistic interactions between the subfunctions. In addition, we also implemented a bio-inspired neuromuscular reflex based controller for a hopping robot to investigate the potential benefits of the muscle properties for the stance (rebounding) leg function. The results demonstrate that the robot can achieve stable and robust hopping with the bio-inspired controller. Further analyses show that the neuromuscular properties play an important role in stabilizing the motion. These results indicate that gait models which include the muscle properties and reflex-like control could better reproduce human locomotion.

The modeling of human locomotion help us test the bio-inspired concepts in the simulation and reveal the key components of human locomotion control. Here, based on the previous findings, we developed a complex neuromuscular gait model to produce subject specific walking behaviors. Deep reinforcement learning methods were used to generate the control policy (sensor-motor mappings) which has similar functionality as human spinal cord neural circuitries. The results show that the model can achieve robust walking and closely reproduce human joint kinematics and muscle activations. In addition, we also found that the neuromuscular dynamics can facilitate the learning. In future, the proposed gait model can be used to identify optimal control schemes for wearable robots (e.g. prostheses, exoskeletons).

In summary, this thesis presents a systematic approach of investigating bio-inspired concepts for human locomotion by experimental studies of human gait, simulations, and hardware implementations. The main contribution of this work is demonstrating how the bio-inspired concepts are extracted from the human experimental data, tested with the simulation models, and implemented and validated with the hardware systems. The outcomes of this thesis can be used as a framework to develop novel bio-inspired controllers for improving the performance of legged robots (e.g. humanoids) and wearable robots (e.g. prostheses, exoskeletons).

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Divisions: 03 Department of Human Sciences
03 Department of Human Sciences > Institut für Sportwissenschaft
03 Department of Human Sciences > Institut für Sportwissenschaft > Sportbiomechanik
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2020 20:55
DOI: 10.25534/tuprints-00011306
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/11306
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-113065
Referees: Seyfarth, Prof. Dr. Andre and von Stryk, Prof. Dr. Oskar
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 1 October 2019
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Nach Millionen von Jahren der Evolution kann der Mensch in komplexen Umgebungen Fortbewegungsaufgaben mit vielseitigen, robusten und effizienten zweibeinigen Gangarten ausführen. Ein Verständnis über die dafür nötige Fortbewegungskontrolle kann uns helfen, neuartige biologisch inspirierte Methoden zur Verbesserung von Robotern mit Beinen (z. B. Humanoide) und tragbaren robotischen Systemen für die untere Extremität (z.B. Prothesen, Exoskelette) zu entwickeln. Diese Dissertation untersucht systematisch biologisch inspirierte Ansätze von den Konzepten bis zur Anwendung, um die menschliche Fortbewegung besser zu verstehen. Sie umfasst drei Hauptteile: biomechanische Studien zu menschlichen Experimenten, die Modellierung der menschlichen Fortbewegung und die Hardware-Implementierungen von biologisch inspirierten Konzepten. Die biomechanischen Studien liefern Einblicke in die menschlichen Bewegungskontrollsysteme. Die Bewegungssteuerung des Menschen kann in drei motorische Unterfunktionen unterteilt werden: den Stand (axiale Beinfunktion), das Schwingen (rotatorische Beinfunktion) und das Gleichgewicht (Haltungssteuerung). In der Arbeit wird untersucht, wie diese Unterfunktionen miteinander interagieren, indem wir den Beitrag von Stand- und Schwungbeinbewegungen zur Gehdynamik analysierten. Die Ergebnisse zeigen einen Kopplungsmechanismus und synergistische Wechselwirkungen zwischen den Teilfunktionen. Weitere experimentellen Daten zur menschlichen Ganginitiierung (vom Stehen bis zum Gehen) zeigen, dass die Funktionen des Schwungbeins und die des Standbeins beim ersten Schritt des Standbeins auftreten. Zudem hat sich gezeigt, dass eine starke Korrelation in den Gelenken zwischen der Kontrolle in der Frontalebene und der Sagittalebene existiert. Alle diese Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die Unterstützung einer Unterfunktion Vorteile für die anderen bietet. Inspiriert von den Ergebnissen früherer biomechanischer Studien haben wir Strategien zur Kontrolle des Gleichgewichts, auf biologisch inspirierter Basis, in ein Gang-Exoskelett für die unteren Extremitäten implementiert. Diese Hardware-Implementierungen werden verwendet, um die Vorteile von biologisch inspirierten Steuerungskonzepten zu validieren und zu demonstrieren. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass der implementierte biologisch inspirierte Gleichgewichts-Controller nicht nur die Schwung- und Standbeinfunktion unterstützen, sondern auch die Stoffwechselkosten senken und damit das menschliche Gehen unterstützen kann. Die Ergebnisse stützen auch die früheren biomechanischen Studien, die auf synergistische Wechselwirkungen zwischen den Teilfunktionen hindeuten. Darüber hinaus haben wir einen bioinspirierten neuromuskulären Reflex-basierten Controller in einen Hüpfroboter implementiert, um die potenziellen Vorteile der Muskeleigenschaften für die Standbeinfunktion (elastischer Rückstoß) zu untersuchen. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass der Roboter mit dem bioinspirierten Controller ein stabiles und robustes Hüpfen erreichen kann. Weitere Analysen zeigen, dass die neuromuskulären Eigenschaften eine wichtige Rolle bei der Stabilisierung der Bewegung spielen. Diese Ergebnisse deuten darauf hin, dass Gangmodelle, welche Muskeleigenschaften und eine reflexartige Steuerung beinhalten, die Fortbewegung des Menschen besser reproduzieren können. Die Modellierung der menschlichen Fortbewegung hilft uns, die biologisch inspirierten Konzepte in der Simulation zu testen und die Schlüsselkomponenten der menschlichen Fortbewegungssteuerung aufzudecken. Hier haben wir auf Basis der bisherigen Erkenntnisse ein komplexes neuromuskuläres Gangmodell entwickelt, um ein personenspezifisches Gehverhalten zu erzeugen. Zur Erstellung der Kontrollrichtlinie (Sensor-Motor-Mappings), welche eine ähnliche Funktionalität wie die neuronalen Schaltkreise des menschlichen Rückenmarks aufweist, wurden Methoden des intensiven Verstärkungslernens (Deep reinforcement learning) verwendet. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass das Modell ein robustes Gehen erreichen und die Kinematik der Gelenke sowie die Aktivierung der Muskeln reproduzieren kann. Darüber hinaus haben wir auch festgestellt, dass die neuromuskuläre Dynamik das Lernen erleichtern kann. In Zukunft kann das vorgeschlagene Gangmodell verwendet werden, um optimale Steuerungsschemata für tragbare Roboter (z.B. Prothesen, Exoskelette) zu identifizieren. Zusammenfassend wird in dieser Dissertation ein systematischer Ansatz vorgestellt, mit dem biologisch inspirierte Konzepte für die menschliche Fortbewegung durch experimentelle Studien zum menschlichen Gang, Simulationen und Hardwareimplementierungen untersucht werden. Der Hauptbeitrag dieser Arbeit besteht darin zu demonstrieren, wie die biologisch inspirierten Konzepte aus den experimentellen Daten des Menschen extrahiert, mit den Simulationsmodellen getestet und mit den Hardwaresystemen implementiert und validiert werden. Die Ergebnisse dieser Dissertation können als Rahmen für die Entwicklung neuartiger biologisch inspirierter Steuerungen zur Verbesserung der Funktionalität von Robotern mit Beinen (z.B. Humanoiden) und tragbaren Robotern (z. B. Prothesen, Exoskelette) verwendet werden.German
Export:
Suche nach Titel in: TUfind oder in Google
Send an inquiry Send an inquiry

Options (only for editors)

View Item View Item