TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Responses to External Perturbations in Selected Human Motor Tasks - A Systematic Review and Analysis.

Tokur, Dario Sinan (2019):
Responses to External Perturbations in Selected Human Motor Tasks - A Systematic Review and Analysis.
Darmstadt, Technische Universität, DOI: 10.25534/tuprints-00009263,
[Online-Edition: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/9263],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

Balance is critical for human posture control when standing upright and during cyclic locomotor tasks such as walking or running, as well as for acyclic tasks such as gait initiation or complex sport movements. In the course of evolution, Homo sapiens developed an upright posture for bipedalism, thus freeing the upper limbs (arms) to interact with objects. Human upright stance is characterized by two straight legs and the center of mass (COM) is located above the hip, thus maximizing potential energy (due to high COM position) enabling great maneuverability for fast re-orientation of the body axis and re-direction of movement direction in space. Nevertheless, bipedalism is mechanically much more challenging (e.g. regarding stability) compared to other body morphologies in legged animals such as a quadrupedal leg configuration. This evolutionary innovation does not only provide benefits (such as those mentioned above), but also makes control functions difficult, which might involve instability of the whole mechanical system with segments arranged like an upside-down chain. To achieve the stable upright human stance and to prevent collapse, it is fundamental to continuously balance all segments above the feet by introducing appropriate joint torques and continuously adjusting the orientation of the ground reaction forces (GRF). Nevertheless, human motor control during tasks such as standing and walking provides stability in the case of external perturbations. Thus, humans are able to respond to external perturbations, such as changing ground level, different ground properties as well as pushes and pulls at different body regions, in order to keep their balance and maintain an upright posture. Given the current biomechanical understanding of human balance and posture control, it is still not well understood which neuro-muscular control mechanisms contribute to maintaining balance in response to external perturbations. In particular, it is not clear, how the contributions to recover from perturbations are organized at different levels, e.g. muscle mechanical response, spinal reflexes, and higher control contributions (e.g. from cortical areas in the brain). The present work focuses on improving this understanding by investigating human movement and posture control in response to different external perturbations. This thesis describes how healthy humans respond to unexpected external perturbations and identifies underlying neuro-muscular mechanisms enabling the motor system to cope with such challenges during locomotion and upright standing through passive and active strategies (e.g. tendon and muscles response, changed muscle activation). The first part of the thesis presents previous research results in a systematic review thus providing insights into how leg function responds to external perturbations in selected motion tasks. It is shown that humans adjust their movements not only to the environmental context (e.g. when walking on even ground vs. slopes or climbing stairs) but also dependent on the state of their motion (i.e. current phase of gait, COM position) and in relation to the type of perturbation like changes in ground or external forces. In the following part of the thesis, human standing experiments were designed to address the ability to cope with external perturbations with respect to axial and rotational leg function. Axial leg function described forces and displacements along the leg axis, pointing from the contact point of the foot to the COM. In contrast, rotational leg function described corresponding forces and displacements perpendicular to leg axis in sagittal plane. As predicted by biomechanical leg models, the results show that biarticular muscles strongly contribute to the redirection of the GRF in order to maintain an upright posture. In a second experimental study on human hopping, the ability to adapt leg stiffness (representing the axial leg function) in order to maintain cyclic movements in response to vertical ground level perturbations was investigated. The findings demonstrate a robust leg function, reflecting the ability of the human neuro-muscular system to cope with unexpected perturbations such as moving ground during hopping. An increase in leg stiffness was found in response to an upward surface acceleration. This thesis describes and analyses the ability of the human body to respond to external perturbations leading to robust movement patterns. By translating the observed coping strategies into biomechanical and motor control models, new approaches for the design and control of legged systems (e.g. for assistive and rehabilitation devices) can be derived.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2019
Creators: Tokur, Dario Sinan
Title: Responses to External Perturbations in Selected Human Motor Tasks - A Systematic Review and Analysis.
Language: English
Abstract:

Balance is critical for human posture control when standing upright and during cyclic locomotor tasks such as walking or running, as well as for acyclic tasks such as gait initiation or complex sport movements. In the course of evolution, Homo sapiens developed an upright posture for bipedalism, thus freeing the upper limbs (arms) to interact with objects. Human upright stance is characterized by two straight legs and the center of mass (COM) is located above the hip, thus maximizing potential energy (due to high COM position) enabling great maneuverability for fast re-orientation of the body axis and re-direction of movement direction in space. Nevertheless, bipedalism is mechanically much more challenging (e.g. regarding stability) compared to other body morphologies in legged animals such as a quadrupedal leg configuration. This evolutionary innovation does not only provide benefits (such as those mentioned above), but also makes control functions difficult, which might involve instability of the whole mechanical system with segments arranged like an upside-down chain. To achieve the stable upright human stance and to prevent collapse, it is fundamental to continuously balance all segments above the feet by introducing appropriate joint torques and continuously adjusting the orientation of the ground reaction forces (GRF). Nevertheless, human motor control during tasks such as standing and walking provides stability in the case of external perturbations. Thus, humans are able to respond to external perturbations, such as changing ground level, different ground properties as well as pushes and pulls at different body regions, in order to keep their balance and maintain an upright posture. Given the current biomechanical understanding of human balance and posture control, it is still not well understood which neuro-muscular control mechanisms contribute to maintaining balance in response to external perturbations. In particular, it is not clear, how the contributions to recover from perturbations are organized at different levels, e.g. muscle mechanical response, spinal reflexes, and higher control contributions (e.g. from cortical areas in the brain). The present work focuses on improving this understanding by investigating human movement and posture control in response to different external perturbations. This thesis describes how healthy humans respond to unexpected external perturbations and identifies underlying neuro-muscular mechanisms enabling the motor system to cope with such challenges during locomotion and upright standing through passive and active strategies (e.g. tendon and muscles response, changed muscle activation). The first part of the thesis presents previous research results in a systematic review thus providing insights into how leg function responds to external perturbations in selected motion tasks. It is shown that humans adjust their movements not only to the environmental context (e.g. when walking on even ground vs. slopes or climbing stairs) but also dependent on the state of their motion (i.e. current phase of gait, COM position) and in relation to the type of perturbation like changes in ground or external forces. In the following part of the thesis, human standing experiments were designed to address the ability to cope with external perturbations with respect to axial and rotational leg function. Axial leg function described forces and displacements along the leg axis, pointing from the contact point of the foot to the COM. In contrast, rotational leg function described corresponding forces and displacements perpendicular to leg axis in sagittal plane. As predicted by biomechanical leg models, the results show that biarticular muscles strongly contribute to the redirection of the GRF in order to maintain an upright posture. In a second experimental study on human hopping, the ability to adapt leg stiffness (representing the axial leg function) in order to maintain cyclic movements in response to vertical ground level perturbations was investigated. The findings demonstrate a robust leg function, reflecting the ability of the human neuro-muscular system to cope with unexpected perturbations such as moving ground during hopping. An increase in leg stiffness was found in response to an upward surface acceleration. This thesis describes and analyses the ability of the human body to respond to external perturbations leading to robust movement patterns. By translating the observed coping strategies into biomechanical and motor control models, new approaches for the design and control of legged systems (e.g. for assistive and rehabilitation devices) can be derived.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Divisions: 03 Department of Human Sciences
03 Department of Human Sciences > Institut für Sportwissenschaft
Date Deposited: 22 Dec 2019 20:55
DOI: 10.25534/tuprints-00009263
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/9263
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-92630
Referees: Seyfarth, Prof. Dr. Andre and Lee, Prof. Dr. David
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 15 October 2019
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Das posturale Gleichgewicht ist für die Kontrolle der menschlichen Körperhaltung sowohl im Stehen als auch bei zyklischen lokomotorischen Bewegungen wie Gehen und Laufen oder bei azyklischen Aufgaben wie der Ganginitiierung oder komplexen sportlichen Bewegungsabläufen entscheidend. Im Laufe der Evolution hat der Homo Sapiens eine aufrechte Haltung für die Zweibeinigkeit entwickelt und ermöglichte so den oberen Gliedmaßen (den Armen) die Interaktion mit Objekten. Die aufrechte menschliche Haltung ist gekennzeichnet durch zwei gestreckte Beine und einen Körperschwerpunk (KSP), welcher oberhalb der Hüfte liegt. Aufgrund der hohen KSP-Position wird die potentielle Energie maximiert und trägt zu einer größeren Manövrierfähigkeit im Hinblick auf eine schnellere Neuausrichtung der Körperachse und Bewegungsrichtung im Raum bei. Dennoch ist die Zweibeinigkeit im Vergleich zu anderen Morphologien, wie beispielsweise der vierbeinigen Körperkonfiguration bei Tieren, eine große Herausforderung. Die Zweibeinigkeit bietet zwar, wie erwähnt, viele Vorteile, erschwert aber auch Steuerungsfunktionen, insbesondere durch die Instabilität des biomechanischen Segment Systems, welches wie eine sich aufrichtende Kette angeordnet ist. Um eine stabile aufrechte Haltung zu erreichen und ein Zusammenbrechen zu verhindern, ist es von grundlegender Bedeutung, alle Segmente oberhalb der Füße kontinuierlich auszubalancieren, indem geeignete Gelenkmomente aufgebracht werden und so die Ausrichtung der Bodenreaktionskräfte (GRF) fortwährend angepasst wird. Gleichwohl verleiht die Steuerung der menschlichen Motorik bei Aufgaben wie Stehen und Gehen Stabilität, auch gegenüber Störeinflüssen von außen. So kann der Mensch beim Auftreten dieser Störungen wie zum Beispiel wechselnden Bodenverhältnissen, unterschiedlichen Bodeneigenschaften sowie Stößen und Zugkräften an verschiedenen Körperregionen umgehen, um sein Gleichgewicht und somit eine aufrechte Körperhaltung zu bewahren. Mit Blick auf das biomechanische Verständnis des menschlichen Gleichgewichts und der Haltungskontrolle ist aktuell noch nicht vollständig geklärt, welche neuro-muskulären Kontrollmechanismen dazu beitragen, das Gleichgewicht als Reaktion auf externe Störungen aufrechtzuerhalten. Insbesondere ist noch nicht vollständig erforscht, wie die Beiträge zur Kompensation von Störungen auf verschiedenen Ebenen der Muskelreaktion, spinaler Reflexe und der übergeordneten Kontrollsysteme wie zum Beispiel von kortikalen Bereichen im Gehirn organisiert sind. Die vorliegende Arbeit konzentriert sich darauf dieses Verständnis durch die Untersuchung der menschlichen Bewegungs- und Haltungskontrolle in Reaktion auf verschiedene äußere Störeinflüsse zu verbessern. Diese Dissertation beschreibt, wie gesunde Menschen auf unerwartete äußere Störungen reagieren und identifiziert dabei die zugrundeliegenden neuro-muskulären Mechanismen, die es dem Bewegungsapparat ermöglichen, mit solchen Herausforderungen während der Fortbewegung durch passive und aktive Strategien (z.B. Sehnen- und Muskelreaktion, veränderte Muskelaktivierung) umzugehen. Im ersten Teil der Thesis stellt ein systematisches Review bisherige Forschungsergebnisse zusammen und gibt so Einblicke, wie die Beinfunktion auf externe Störungen in ausgewählten Bewegungsaufgaben reagiert. Es wird aufgezeigt, dass der Mensch seine Bewegungen nicht nur an den Umgebungskontext anpasst (zum Beispiel beim Gehen auf ebenem Untergrund gegenüber Anstiegen oder beim Treppensteigen), sondern auch an den aktuellen Bewegungskontext (zum Beispiel momentane Gangphase, KSP-Position) sowie an die Art der Störung (zum Beispiel Bodenveränderungen oder externe Krafteinflüsse). Im anschließenden Teil der Arbeit werden am Menschen durchgeführte Standexperimente vorgestellt, welche die Fähigkeit untersuchen, mit externen Störungen in Bezug auf die axiale und rotatorische Beinfunktion umzugehen. Die axiale Beinfunktion beschreibt hierbei Kräfte und Bewegungen entlang der Beinachse; die virtuelle Achse zeigt vom Kraftangriffspunkt des Fußes (am Boden) zum KSP. Im Gegensatz dazu beschreibt die rotatorische Beinfunktion entsprechende Kräfte und Verschiebungen orthogonal zur Beinachse in sagittaler Ebene. Wie von biomechanischen Beinmodellen vorhergesagt, bestätigen die Ergebnisse, dass zweigelenkige Muskeln stark zur Neuausrichtung der GRF beitragen und damit die aufrechte Körperhaltung unterstützen. In einer zweiten experimentellen Studie, zum Hüpfen auf der Stelle, wird die Anpassungsfähigkeit der Beinsteifigkeit, die die axiale Beinfunktion widerspiegelt, bei vertikalen Bodenstörungen einen gleichmäßigen Bewegungsablauf aufrechtzuerhalten untersucht. Die Ergebnisse zeigen eine robuste Beinfunktion, die die Fähigkeit des menschlichen neuromuskulären Systems widerspiegelt, unerwartete Störungen (zum Beispiel das Nachgeben des Bodens) zu kompensieren. Darüber hinaus deuten die Erkenntnisse auf eine störungsabhängige Zunahme der Beinsteifigkeit (zum Beispiel durch Reflexe) als Reaktion auf eine Aufwärtsbeschleunigung des Untergrundes hin. Diese Dissertation beschreibt und analysiert die Fähigkeit des menschlichen Körpers auf externe Störungen zu reagieren, die zu robusten Bewegungsmustern beiträgt. Die Übertragung der beobachteten Kompensationsstrategien auf biomechanische und motorische Kontrollmodelle ermöglicht neue Ansätze für das Design und die Kontrolle von (künstlichen) Bewegungssystemen wie zum Beispiel für Assistenz- und Rehabilitationsgeräte.German
Export:
Suche nach Titel in: TUfind oder in Google
Send an inquiry Send an inquiry

Options (only for editors)
Show editorial Details Show editorial Details