TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Social Cues as Digital Nudges in Information Systems Usage Contexts

Adam, Martin (2019):
Social Cues as Digital Nudges in Information Systems Usage Contexts.
Darmstadt, Technische Universität, [Online-Edition: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/8848],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

Analysing human cognition and decision-making has become highly relevant in information systems (IS) research. Yet, although the notion of cognitive biases has been studied for more than 40 years in psychology and other related fields, IS researchers have only recently expressed explicit interest in this phenomenon. Even more nascent is the IS stream that emphasizes the usage and understanding of biases in the favor of humanistic outcomes (e.g., the well-being of individuals) beyond previous scientific endeavors to pursue instrumental goals (e.g., the profit of companies). This fact is reflected in the recent emergence and call for digital nudges - influences that rely on heuristics and biases to guide individuals to beneficial decisions through modest adjustments of the digital choice environments. To advance the emergent research in this field, this thesis targets one of the major bias categories: the social bias (i.e., systematic errors that result from an individual’s interpretation of social cues). Within four articles, the thesis addresses the role of social cues as digital nudges in various IS usage contexts. The first two articles investigate how directly-traceable social cues can overcome service adoption hurdles: Precisely, the first article investigates how employing a verbal (i.e., platform self-disclosure) and a nonverbal social cue (i.e., message interactivity) in a conversational agent (i.e., chatbot) influence users to voluntary self-disclose private information (i.e., e-mail addresses). Moreover, the results revealed that the analysed social cues do not have individual effects, but in fact boost each other through their interaction. The second article deals with the application of various directly-traceable social cues (e.g., pictures of human avatars) as well as the role of personalized recommendations in financial advisory services to improve investors’ financial well-being. The results demonstrate that not only directly-traceable social cues but also recommendations can increase a user’s perceived social presence during the interaction, which in turn influences potential investors to invest higher amounts. The third article continues with recommendations as social cues, yet analyses them from an indirectly-traceable perspective and is devoted to investigating whether the source of the recommendation (i.e., seller or other customers) influences the acceptance of the recommendation in augmented reality applications to help customers in finding the best product for their needs. The findings indicate that customer recommendations reduce a customer’s perceived fit uncertainty of a product, resulting in a higher intention to purchase of a product that previous customers recommended. However, customers refrain from adhering to an automatically-generated recommendation despite recent technological advances that may provide more personalized and thus more suitable recommendations than generic customer recommendations. The fourth and last article examines the impact of displaying sold-out products on campaign success in reward-based crowdfunding. The valuable information indicate how potential backers make use of displayed sold-out product as social cues to derive information for their decision-making from previous backing behavior. In addition, the findings also showed that sold-out products do not have an impact on their own, however, their effect is also influenced by other factors in the environment, namely discount amount and the number of backers (i.e., another social cue). Thus, the article provides learnings for project creators on the design of reward option menus. Overall, this thesis showcases the variety and importance of social cues in numerous applications and is, therefore, to be understood as a first approach to expanding the understudied research field. Furthermore, the results enrich previous research and elucidate various underlying explanatory mechanisms of how and why biased decision-making takes place and how these mechanisms may be used to nudge users in directions beneficial for them and for the employer of these nudges. The overarching contributions of this thesis for research consists of (1) investigating the existence and effects of various social cues on user decision-making, and (2) probing social cues in several IS usage contexts with their unique circumstances and influences, not only in a vacuum but also in conjunction with other interacting variables. Additionally, this thesis provides interesting and sometimes even counterintuitive recommendations as well as actionable and generalizable guidelines on social cues that practitioners can easily apply to various contexts.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2019
Creators: Adam, Martin
Title: Social Cues as Digital Nudges in Information Systems Usage Contexts
Language: English
Abstract:

Analysing human cognition and decision-making has become highly relevant in information systems (IS) research. Yet, although the notion of cognitive biases has been studied for more than 40 years in psychology and other related fields, IS researchers have only recently expressed explicit interest in this phenomenon. Even more nascent is the IS stream that emphasizes the usage and understanding of biases in the favor of humanistic outcomes (e.g., the well-being of individuals) beyond previous scientific endeavors to pursue instrumental goals (e.g., the profit of companies). This fact is reflected in the recent emergence and call for digital nudges - influences that rely on heuristics and biases to guide individuals to beneficial decisions through modest adjustments of the digital choice environments. To advance the emergent research in this field, this thesis targets one of the major bias categories: the social bias (i.e., systematic errors that result from an individual’s interpretation of social cues). Within four articles, the thesis addresses the role of social cues as digital nudges in various IS usage contexts. The first two articles investigate how directly-traceable social cues can overcome service adoption hurdles: Precisely, the first article investigates how employing a verbal (i.e., platform self-disclosure) and a nonverbal social cue (i.e., message interactivity) in a conversational agent (i.e., chatbot) influence users to voluntary self-disclose private information (i.e., e-mail addresses). Moreover, the results revealed that the analysed social cues do not have individual effects, but in fact boost each other through their interaction. The second article deals with the application of various directly-traceable social cues (e.g., pictures of human avatars) as well as the role of personalized recommendations in financial advisory services to improve investors’ financial well-being. The results demonstrate that not only directly-traceable social cues but also recommendations can increase a user’s perceived social presence during the interaction, which in turn influences potential investors to invest higher amounts. The third article continues with recommendations as social cues, yet analyses them from an indirectly-traceable perspective and is devoted to investigating whether the source of the recommendation (i.e., seller or other customers) influences the acceptance of the recommendation in augmented reality applications to help customers in finding the best product for their needs. The findings indicate that customer recommendations reduce a customer’s perceived fit uncertainty of a product, resulting in a higher intention to purchase of a product that previous customers recommended. However, customers refrain from adhering to an automatically-generated recommendation despite recent technological advances that may provide more personalized and thus more suitable recommendations than generic customer recommendations. The fourth and last article examines the impact of displaying sold-out products on campaign success in reward-based crowdfunding. The valuable information indicate how potential backers make use of displayed sold-out product as social cues to derive information for their decision-making from previous backing behavior. In addition, the findings also showed that sold-out products do not have an impact on their own, however, their effect is also influenced by other factors in the environment, namely discount amount and the number of backers (i.e., another social cue). Thus, the article provides learnings for project creators on the design of reward option menus. Overall, this thesis showcases the variety and importance of social cues in numerous applications and is, therefore, to be understood as a first approach to expanding the understudied research field. Furthermore, the results enrich previous research and elucidate various underlying explanatory mechanisms of how and why biased decision-making takes place and how these mechanisms may be used to nudge users in directions beneficial for them and for the employer of these nudges. The overarching contributions of this thesis for research consists of (1) investigating the existence and effects of various social cues on user decision-making, and (2) probing social cues in several IS usage contexts with their unique circumstances and influences, not only in a vacuum but also in conjunction with other interacting variables. Additionally, this thesis provides interesting and sometimes even counterintuitive recommendations as well as actionable and generalizable guidelines on social cues that practitioners can easily apply to various contexts.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Divisions: 01 Department of Law and Economics
01 Department of Law and Economics > Betriebswirtschaftliche Fachgebiete
01 Department of Law and Economics > Betriebswirtschaftliche Fachgebiete > Fachgebiet Information Systems & E-Services
Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2019 19:55
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/8848
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-88487
Referees: Benlian, Prof. Dr. Alexander and Buxmann, Prof. Dr. Peter
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 4 July 2019
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Das Analysieren menschlichen Denkens und Entscheidens hat in der Forschung zu Informationssystemen (IS) zunehmend an Relevanz gewonnen. Während jedoch die Idee von kognitiven Verzerrungen (d.h. cognitive biases) seit über 40 Jahren in Psychologie und anlehnenden Forschungsfeldern studiert wurde, haben IS Forscher erst vor kurzer Zeit Interesse an dem Phänomen explizit ausgedrückt. Noch jünger ist dabei die IS Strömung, die sich auf die Nutzung und das Verstehen von kognitiven Verzerrungen zugunsten von humanistischen Zielen (z.B. das Wohlbefinden von Individuen) ausrichtet, während die bisherige Forschung vor allem das Erreichen von instrumentalen Zielen (z.B. die Profite von Unternehmen) verfolgte. Diese Beschränkung der bisherigen Forschung wird hervorgehoben vor allem durch das kürzliche Erscheinen von und dem Ruf nach „digitalen Schubsern“ (d.h. digital nudges) – Beeinflussungen, die sich kognitive Verzerrungen zunutze machen, um Individuen durch mäßige Anpassungen der digitalen Umgebung zu vorteilhaften Entscheidungen zu führen. Um dieses noch junge Forschungsfeld voranzubringen, zielt die Dissertation darauf ab, Erkenntnisse zu einer wichtigen Kategorie der Verzerrungen - sozial-bedingte Verzerrungen (d.h. social biases) - zu liefern, welche als systematische Fehler in der Interpretation von sozialen Hinweisen verstanden werden können. Innerhalb von vier veröffentlichten Artikeln addressiert die Dissertation die Rolle von sozialen Hinweisen als digitale Schubser in verschiedenen IS-Nutzungs-Kontexten. Die ersten beiden Artikel untersuchen wie direkt verfolgbare soziale Hinweise die Annahme von neuer Technologie und das Einführen eines Nutzers in einen neuen Kontext erleichtern kann. Im ersten Artikel geht es dabei um den Gebrauch eines verbalen (d.h. Selbstoffenbarung) und eines nichtverbalen sozialen Hinweises (d.h. Interaktivität der Nachricht) und wie dieser Gebrauch in einem Chatbot den Nutzer dazu beeinflusst persönliche Informationen freiwillig preiszugeben. Die Ergebnisse weisen darüber hinaus darauf hin, dass die sozialen Hinweise nicht nur individuelle Effekte besitzen, sondern dass sich die Effekte gegenseitig durch eine Interaktion verstärken. Der zweite Artikel handelt über die Anwendung von verschiedenen direkt verfolgbaren sozialen Hinweisen und die Rolle von personalisierten Empfehlungen in digitalen Finanzverwaltern, um die Investitionsmenge von Nutzern zu erhöhen und dadurch Nutzer finanziell besser zu stellen. Die Ergebnisse demonstrieren, dass nicht nur direkt verfolgbare soziale Hinweise (z.B. ein Bild eines menschlichen Avatars) sondern auch explizite Empfehlungen die wahrgenommene soziale Präsenz während der Interaktion erhöhen, wodurch der Nutzer die Investitionsmenge erhöht. Der dritte Artikel fährt mit Empfehlungen als soziale Hinweise fort, analysiert jedoch ihre Wirkung aus der Perspektive wenn Nutzer die Hinweise indirekt wahrnehmen. Außerdem untersucht der Artikel ob die Quelle (d.h. Verkäufer oder andere Kunden) den Nutzer darin beeinflusst die Empfehlung zu akzeptieren und was dies für Auswirkungen hat, den Nutzer bei der Suche nach dem besten Produkt für seine oder ihre Bedarfe zu unterstützen. Die Untersuchungsergebnisse deuten darauf hin, dass Empfehlungen durch Kunden die wahrgenomme Unsicherheit eines potentiellen Kunden reduzieren, was dazu führt, dass der potentielle Kunde eine höhere Kaufbereitschaft als auch eine höhere Wahrscheinlichkeit entwickelt, das empfohlene Produkt zu kaufen. Auf der anderen Seite wirken automatisch generierte Empfehlungen des Verkäufers nicht signifikant auf die Kaufentscheidung des Nutzers, obwohl kürzlich technologische Entwicklungen andeuten, dass diese Art der Verkäuferempfehlungen durch die bessere Personalisierung auf die individuellen Bedarfe der Nutzer zu besseren Empfehlungen führen. Der vierte und letzte Artikel untersucht die Auswirkung der Anzeige von ausverkauften Produkten auf den Erfolg von Kampagnen in Reward-Based Crowdfunding. Die Ergebnisse erklären, wie potentielle Unterstützer die angezeigten, ausverkauften Produkte als soziale Hinweise nutzen, um Informationen aus dem vergangenen Verhalten für ihre Entscheidungsfindung abzuleiten. Zusätzlich weisen die Funde darauf hin, dass ausverkaufte Produkte nicht nur einen eigenen Effekt haben, sondern auch von anderen Faktoren in der Umgebung abhängig sind, nämlich von der Höhe des Preisnachlasses und der Anzahl an bereits existierenden Unterstützern (d.h. ein anderer sozialer Hinweis). Demzufolge stellt der Artikel auch Erkenntnisse über das Menu Design von Belohnungen zur Verfügung, die Projektersteller in der Praxis nutzen können. Zusammenfassend präsentiert die Dissertation die Vielfalt und Wichtigkeit von sozialen Hinweisen in zahlreichen Anwendungsfällen und ist daher als eine der ersten Bemühungen zu verstehen, um das bisher wenig erforschte Forschungsfeld mit Erkenntnissen zu erweitern. Darüber hinaus bereichern die Ergebnisse die bisherige Forschung und erläutern verschiedene zugrunde liegende Mechanismen darüber wie und warum verzerrte Entscheidungsfindung stattfindet und wie diese genutzt werden kann. Die größten Beiträge für die Forschung bestehen daher aus (1) der Untersuchung der Effekte von verschiedenen sozialen Hinweisen im Entscheidungsfindungsprozess und (2) dem Erforschen sozialer Hinweise in einigen IS-Nutzungs-Kontexten mit ihren einzigartigen Umständen und Einflüssen, die mit anderen Variablen in der Umgebung interagieren. Darüber hinaus bietet die Dissertation interessante und teilweise überraschende Handlungsempfehlungen sowie leicht umsetzbare und generalisierbare Richtlinien zu sozialen Hinweisen, die Praktiker in verschiedenen Kontexten anwenden können.German
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

View Item View Item