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Examination of the Connection between Selective Laser-Melted Components Made of 316L Steel Powder on Conventionally Fabricated Base Bodies

Link, Martin and Haefele, Tobias and Abele, Eberhard (2018):
Examination of the Connection between Selective Laser-Melted Components Made of 316L Steel Powder on Conventionally Fabricated Base Bodies.
In: Proceedings, 29th Annual International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium – An Additive Manufacturing Conference, Austin, Texas (USA), pp. 403-410, [Article]

Abstract

The advantages of selective laser melting lie in the production of complex, small components in small batches. For large-volume components, the use of additive manufacturing (AM) processes is limited by the available installation space, low build rates, and high material costs. For the production of large and less complex workpieces, conventional manufacturing processes such as milling are more economical. The background of this study was to combine both processes to decrease manufacturing times. For this purpose, a body made of 316L (1.4404) steel powder was printed using selective laser melting on conventionally manufactured stainless-steel base bodies. The use of multi-materials enables optimized machinability in the respective manufacturing process. This paper examines the hardness properties of multi-material samples and uses micrographs to analyze the microstructure of their connection area. A complete connection between hybrid components made of comparable materials was determined.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2018
Creators: Link, Martin and Haefele, Tobias and Abele, Eberhard
Title: Examination of the Connection between Selective Laser-Melted Components Made of 316L Steel Powder on Conventionally Fabricated Base Bodies
Language: English
Abstract:

The advantages of selective laser melting lie in the production of complex, small components in small batches. For large-volume components, the use of additive manufacturing (AM) processes is limited by the available installation space, low build rates, and high material costs. For the production of large and less complex workpieces, conventional manufacturing processes such as milling are more economical. The background of this study was to combine both processes to decrease manufacturing times. For this purpose, a body made of 316L (1.4404) steel powder was printed using selective laser melting on conventionally manufactured stainless-steel base bodies. The use of multi-materials enables optimized machinability in the respective manufacturing process. This paper examines the hardness properties of multi-material samples and uses micrographs to analyze the microstructure of their connection area. A complete connection between hybrid components made of comparable materials was determined.

Journal or Publication Title: Proceedings, 29th Annual International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium – An Additive Manufacturing Conference, Austin, Texas (USA)
Divisions: 16 Department of Mechanical Engineering
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute of Production Management, Technology and Machine Tools (PTW)
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute of Production Management, Technology and Machine Tools (PTW) > Additive Manufacturing and Dental Technology
Date Deposited: 21 Jan 2019 14:28
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