TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Degradation studies of Me-N-C catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Fuel Cells.

Martinaiou, Ioanna (2018):
Degradation studies of Me-N-C catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Fuel Cells.
Darmstadt, Technische Universität, [Online-Edition: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/8351],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

The increasing demand for renewable energy along with the requirement of decreasing CO2 emissions is a major challenge for the scientific community. Fuel cells are among the most promising electrochemical devices because of their low operating temperature and high power density. The main advantage of a fuel cell is that electrical power can be produced continuously as long as the fuel supply is provided. Another important advantage is high efficiency. The efficiency of fuel cells is superior to that of combustion engines, particularly at low loads, which makes low-temperature fuel cells (0―100 °C) attractive for automotive propulsion. State of the art catalyst for the anode as well as the cathode is typically based on platinum-supported on carbon. However, the platinum catalyst alone would account for 38-56% of the stack cost [1]. Thus the higher efficiency, in comparison to combustion engines, comes with a higher price that makes the commercialization not competitive now. As a large quantity of the precious metal is required to catalyse the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), current research is focused on this reaction and especially on the development of alternative non-precious metal catalysts (NPMC). In order for these catalysts to be a commercially viable solution for replacing platinum-based catalysts, they should meet two criteria, improving both activity and stability of these catalysts. Despite, several milestones that have been achieved regarding the activity of these catalysts [2– 5], stability is still relatively poor in comparison to platinum-based systems. This dissertation focuses on the investigation of the stability of non-precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction mainly in acidic media for application in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) and Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs). Α part of this study also deals with performance determination of NPMC in alkaline media, regarding their application in Alkaline Fuel Cells (AFCs). The electrochemical tests were performed with a Rotating Disk Electrode technique. Stability refers to the ability of a system to maintain performance at constant current (or voltage) conditions, while durability refers to the ability to maintain performance following a voltage cycling. First, a systematic study on the impact of the metal centre on durability was conducted. Thirteen Me-N-C catalysts were examined with a Start/ Stop (SSC) durability protocol in the potential range of 1.0 V – 1.5 V. Raman spectroscopy was performed before and after the durability tests and a correlation between electrochemical evaluation and Raman spectroscopy in this potential region was found. The carbon oxidation is related to the disintegration of active MeN4 sites that might be initiated by both: the oxidation of the surrounding graphene sheets and by a displacement of the metal out of the N4 plane and this was evidenced by a decrease in the D3 band. Furthermore, a novel synthesis protocol was developed in our group and a Fe-N-C catalyst was optimized with the addition of sulfur (S) in the precursor. With respect to activity the best-off S-added catalyst and the S-free one were then examined for durability under a Load Cycle (LC) protocol (0.6 – 1.0 V) in alkaline media. A modification of both catalysts with ionic liquid (IL) was introduced by the group of Professor B. J.M. Etzold within a cooperation framework. The durability of the modified S-free catalyst was found superior to the durability of the non-modified catalyst. In the case of the S-added catalyst, the IL modification did not further improve its durability. Finally, a third synthesis approach was developed, leading to an active Fe-N-C catalyst also with sulfur in the precursor. The stability of this catalyst was investigated in a DMFC within a research stay abroad project in collaboration with Professor S. Specchia from Politecnico di Torino and subsequently examined by post mortem Mössbauer spectroscopy. This catalyst was further evaluated with a Load Cycle durability protocol and post mortem Raman spectroscopy in our laboratories.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2018
Creators: Martinaiou, Ioanna
Title: Degradation studies of Me-N-C catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Fuel Cells.
Language: English
Abstract:

The increasing demand for renewable energy along with the requirement of decreasing CO2 emissions is a major challenge for the scientific community. Fuel cells are among the most promising electrochemical devices because of their low operating temperature and high power density. The main advantage of a fuel cell is that electrical power can be produced continuously as long as the fuel supply is provided. Another important advantage is high efficiency. The efficiency of fuel cells is superior to that of combustion engines, particularly at low loads, which makes low-temperature fuel cells (0―100 °C) attractive for automotive propulsion. State of the art catalyst for the anode as well as the cathode is typically based on platinum-supported on carbon. However, the platinum catalyst alone would account for 38-56% of the stack cost [1]. Thus the higher efficiency, in comparison to combustion engines, comes with a higher price that makes the commercialization not competitive now. As a large quantity of the precious metal is required to catalyse the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), current research is focused on this reaction and especially on the development of alternative non-precious metal catalysts (NPMC). In order for these catalysts to be a commercially viable solution for replacing platinum-based catalysts, they should meet two criteria, improving both activity and stability of these catalysts. Despite, several milestones that have been achieved regarding the activity of these catalysts [2– 5], stability is still relatively poor in comparison to platinum-based systems. This dissertation focuses on the investigation of the stability of non-precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction mainly in acidic media for application in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) and Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs). Α part of this study also deals with performance determination of NPMC in alkaline media, regarding their application in Alkaline Fuel Cells (AFCs). The electrochemical tests were performed with a Rotating Disk Electrode technique. Stability refers to the ability of a system to maintain performance at constant current (or voltage) conditions, while durability refers to the ability to maintain performance following a voltage cycling. First, a systematic study on the impact of the metal centre on durability was conducted. Thirteen Me-N-C catalysts were examined with a Start/ Stop (SSC) durability protocol in the potential range of 1.0 V – 1.5 V. Raman spectroscopy was performed before and after the durability tests and a correlation between electrochemical evaluation and Raman spectroscopy in this potential region was found. The carbon oxidation is related to the disintegration of active MeN4 sites that might be initiated by both: the oxidation of the surrounding graphene sheets and by a displacement of the metal out of the N4 plane and this was evidenced by a decrease in the D3 band. Furthermore, a novel synthesis protocol was developed in our group and a Fe-N-C catalyst was optimized with the addition of sulfur (S) in the precursor. With respect to activity the best-off S-added catalyst and the S-free one were then examined for durability under a Load Cycle (LC) protocol (0.6 – 1.0 V) in alkaline media. A modification of both catalysts with ionic liquid (IL) was introduced by the group of Professor B. J.M. Etzold within a cooperation framework. The durability of the modified S-free catalyst was found superior to the durability of the non-modified catalyst. In the case of the S-added catalyst, the IL modification did not further improve its durability. Finally, a third synthesis approach was developed, leading to an active Fe-N-C catalyst also with sulfur in the precursor. The stability of this catalyst was investigated in a DMFC within a research stay abroad project in collaboration with Professor S. Specchia from Politecnico di Torino and subsequently examined by post mortem Mössbauer spectroscopy. This catalyst was further evaluated with a Load Cycle durability protocol and post mortem Raman spectroscopy in our laboratories.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Catalysts and Electrocatalysts
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2019 20:55
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/8351
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-83511
Referees: Kramm, Prof. Dr. Ulrike I. and Monteverde Videla, Prof. Dr. Alessandro H. A. and Stark, Prof. Dr. Robert W. and Jaegermann, Prof. Dr. Wolfram
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 25 June 2018
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Die steigende Nachfrage nach erneuerbaren Energien, zusammen mit der Forderung nach einer Verringerung der CO2-Emissionen, ist eine der großen Herausforderungen für die Weltgemeinschaft. Eine Möglichkeit die CO2 Emissionen, insbesondere im Verkehrssektor zu reduzieren, liegt in der Abkehr der herkömmlichen Verbrennungsmotoren. Niedertemperatur-Brennstoffzellen gehören hierbei zu den vielversprechendsten elektrochemischen Antriebssystemen, aufgrund ihrer niedrigen Betriebstemperatur und hoher Leistungsdichte. Der Hauptvorteil einer Brennstoffzelle ist, dass elektrische Energie kontinuierlich erzeugt werden kann, solange die Brennstoffversorgung zur Verfügung steht. Ein weiterer wichtiger Vorteil ist die hohe Effizienz. Der Wirkungsgrad von Brennstoffzellen ist dem von Verbrennungsmotoren, insbesondere bei niedrigen Lasten überlegen, was Niedertemperatur-Brennstoffzellen (0 - 100 ° C) für den Fahrzeugantrieb attraktiv macht. „State-of-the Art“ Katalysatoren für die Anode sowie die Kathode basieren typischerweise auf Platin, das auf Kohlenstoff geträgert ist. Der Platinkatalysator allein würde jedoch 38-56% der Stackkosten ausmachen [1]. Daher bringt der höhere Wirkungsgrad im Vergleich zu Verbrennungsmotoren einen höheren Preis mit sich, der die Kommerzialisierung derzeit nicht wettbewerbsfähig macht. Da eine große Menge des Edelmetalls zur Katalyse der Sauerstoffreduktionsreaktion (ORR) benötigt wird, konzentriert sich die Forschung derzeit auf die Reaktion und insbesondere die Entwicklung alternativer Nichtedelmetallkatalysatoren (NPMC). Damit diese Katalysatoren eine kommerziell brauchbare Lösung zum Ersetzen von Katalysatoren auf Platinbasis darstellen können, sollten zwei Kriterien erfüllt sein, die sowohl die Aktivität als auch die Stabilität dieser Katalysatoren verbessern. Trotz einiger vielversprechenden Entwicklungen in Bezug auf die Aktivität dieser Katalysatoren [2– 5] ist die Stabilität, im Vergleich zu Systemen auf Platinbasis, noch relativ gering. Diese Dissertation konzentriert sich auf die Untersuchung der Stabilität von Nichtedelmetallkatalysatoren für die Sauerstoffreduktionsreaktion, hauptsächlich in sauren Medien, für die Anwendung in „Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells“ (PEMFC, dt: Polymerelektrolytbrennstoffzelle) sowie „Direct Methanol Fuel Cells“ (DMFC, dt.: Direkt-Methanol Brennstoffzelle). Ein Teil dieser Studie befasst sich mit der Leistungsbestimmung von NPMC in alkalischen Medien bezüglich ihrer Anwendung in „Alkaline Fuel Cells“ (AFCs, dt.: alkalische-Brennstoffzelle). Die elektrochemischen Tests wurden hierbei mit einer „Rotating Disk Electrode“ durchgeführt. Stabilität bezieht sich auf die Fähigkeit eines Systems, die Leistung bei konstanten Strombedingungen (oder Spannungsbedingungen) aufrechtzuerhalten, während sich Beständigkeit auf die Fähigkeit bezieht, die Leistung nach einem Spannungswechsel aufrechtzuerhalten. Zunächst wurde eine systematische Studie über den Einfluss des Metallzentrums auf die Beständigkeit des Katalysators durchgeführt. Dreizehn Me-N-C-Katalysatoren wurden mit einem Start / Stop- Beständigkeitsprotokoll (SSC) im Potentialbereich von 1.0 V bis 1.5 V untersucht. Vor und nach den Beständigkeitstests wurden mittels Raman-Spektroskopie eine Korrelation zwischen dem elektrochemischen Verhalten und den Raman-Messungen in diesen Potentialregionen nachgewiesen. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass Kohlenstoffoxidation die Degradation aktiver Me-N4-Zentren begünstigt. Dabei verstärkt die Kohlenstoffoxydation der umgebenden Graphenschichten das auflösen der Matrix und begünstigt das „auswaschen“ des Metalls aus der N4-Koordination. Dies wurde durch eine Abnahme der D3-Bande bestätigt. Darüber hinaus entwickelte unserer Gruppe ein neues Syntheseprotokoll, optimierte in der Vorstufe ein Fe-N-C-Katalysator durch die Zugabe von Schwefel (S) und verglich diesen mit einen S-freien Katalysator. Eine Modifikation beider Katalysatoren, durch die Zugabe einer ionischen Flüssigkeit (IL), wurde von der Gruppe um Professor B. J. M. Etzold, im Rahmen einer Kooperation umgesetzt. Dabei wurden die Aktivitäten des aktivsten Katalysators, mit und ohne S-Zugabe, verglichen. Hierfür wurde ein zyklisches-Lastprotokoll (Load Cycle (LC) –Protokoll, 0.6 – 1.0 V) in einen alkalischen Elektrolyten angewendet und die Beständigkeit der Katalysatoren untersucht. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass die Lebensdauer des modifizierten Katalysators, jener des S-freien Katalysators überlegen ist. Die IL-Modifikation zeigte jedoch nur einen positiven Einfluss auf den S-freien Katalysator. Schließlich wurde ein dritter Syntheseansatz entwickelt, der zu einem aktiven Fe-N-C-Katalysator mit Schwefel in der Vorstufe führt. Die Stabilität dieses Katalysators wurde in einer DMFC im Rahmen eines Forschungsaufenthaltes im Ausland in Zusammenarbeit mit Professor S. Specchia vom Politecnico di Torino untersucht und post-mortem mittels Mößbauer-Spektroskopie untersucht. Zusätzlich wurde in unseren Laboren mit einem Load Cycle-Beständigkeitsprotokoll und einer post-mortem-Raman-Untersuchungen durchgeführt.German
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

View Item View Item