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Planar Arrays of Nanoporous Gold Nanowires: When Electrochemical Dealloying Meets Nanopatterning

Chauvin, A. and Delacote, C. and Molina-Luna, Leopoldo and Duerrschnabel, Michael and Boujtita, M. and Thiry, D. and Du, K. and Ding, J. and Choi, C.-H. and Tessier, P. Y. and El Mel, A.-A. (2016):
Planar Arrays of Nanoporous Gold Nanowires: When Electrochemical Dealloying Meets Nanopatterning.
In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 8 (10), American Chemical Society, pp. 6611-6620, ISSN 1944-8252,
DOI: 10.1021/acsami.5b11244,
[Article]

Abstract

Nanoporous materials are of great interest for various technological applications including sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering, catalysis, and biotechnology. Currently, tremendous efforts are dedicated to the development of porous one-dimensional materials to improve the properties of such class of materials. The main drawback of the synthesis approaches reported so far includes (i) the short length of the porous nanowires, which cannot reach the macroscopic scale, and (ii) the poor organization of the nanostructures obtained by the end of the synthesis process. In this work, we report for the first time on a two-step approach allowing creating highly ordered porous gold nanowire arrays with a length up to a few centimeters. This two-step approach consists of the growth of gold/copper alloy nanowires by magnetron cosputtering on a nanograted silicon substrate, serving as a physical template, followed by a selective dissolution of copper by an electrochemical anodic process in diluted sulfuric acid. We demonstrate that the pore size of the nanowires can be tailored between 6 and 21 nm by tuning the dealloying voltage between 0.2 and 0.4 V and the dealloying time within the range of 150–600 s. We further show that the initial gold content (11 to 26 atom %) and the diameter of the gold/copper alloy nanowires (135 to 250 nm) are two important parameters that must carefully be selected to precisely control the porosity of the material.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2016
Creators: Chauvin, A. and Delacote, C. and Molina-Luna, Leopoldo and Duerrschnabel, Michael and Boujtita, M. and Thiry, D. and Du, K. and Ding, J. and Choi, C.-H. and Tessier, P. Y. and El Mel, A.-A.
Title: Planar Arrays of Nanoporous Gold Nanowires: When Electrochemical Dealloying Meets Nanopatterning
Language: English
Abstract:

Nanoporous materials are of great interest for various technological applications including sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering, catalysis, and biotechnology. Currently, tremendous efforts are dedicated to the development of porous one-dimensional materials to improve the properties of such class of materials. The main drawback of the synthesis approaches reported so far includes (i) the short length of the porous nanowires, which cannot reach the macroscopic scale, and (ii) the poor organization of the nanostructures obtained by the end of the synthesis process. In this work, we report for the first time on a two-step approach allowing creating highly ordered porous gold nanowire arrays with a length up to a few centimeters. This two-step approach consists of the growth of gold/copper alloy nanowires by magnetron cosputtering on a nanograted silicon substrate, serving as a physical template, followed by a selective dissolution of copper by an electrochemical anodic process in diluted sulfuric acid. We demonstrate that the pore size of the nanowires can be tailored between 6 and 21 nm by tuning the dealloying voltage between 0.2 and 0.4 V and the dealloying time within the range of 150–600 s. We further show that the initial gold content (11 to 26 atom %) and the diameter of the gold/copper alloy nanowires (135 to 250 nm) are two important parameters that must carefully be selected to precisely control the porosity of the material.

Journal or Publication Title: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume: 8
Number: 10
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Uncontrolled Keywords: copper, dealloying, gold, nanoporous, nanowires
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Advanced Electron Microscopy (aem)
Date Deposited: 10 Dec 2018 09:36
DOI: 10.1021/acsami.5b11244
Funders: The JEOL JEM-2100F transmission electron microscope employed for this work was partially funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG/INST163/2951)., M.D. acknowledges financial support from the LOEWE research cluster RESPONSE (Hessen, Germany)., D.T. would like to thank “la Région des Pays de la Loire-France” for financially assisting this research project through the “Post-Doctorats internationaux” program.
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