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Training Effects of Combined Resistance and Proprioceptive Neck Muscle Exercising

Kramer, Michael and Hohl, Kathrin and Bockholt, Ulrich and Schneider, Florian and Dehner, Christoph (2013):
Training Effects of Combined Resistance and Proprioceptive Neck Muscle Exercising.
In: Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, 26 (2), pp. 189-199. DOI: 10.3233/BMR-130368,
[Article]

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To investigate training effects of two different resistance and proprioceptive exercising concepts of neck muscles. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Twenty-six healthy women participated in a randomized pilot trial. The test persons were randomized to two different neck-training programs (resistance training (RT) and proprioceptive resistance training (PRT)). They performed a standardized training program for the duration of ten weeks two times weekly. The neck strength, the cross-sectional area of three neck muscle groups (1. sternocleidomastoid muscles; 2. multifidus and semispinalis cervicis muscles; 3. semispinalis capitis and splenius muscles) and the proprioceptive capability evaluated by the dynamic joint repositioning error (DJRE) of the head were assessed pre- and post-intervention. RESULTS: Strength gain did not differ significantly between the two resistance training groups (PRT group: 8.2 to 29.3; RT group: 1.4 to 19.8). Change of hypertrophy of all neck muscle groups was significantly (p< 0.001 to p=0.013) greater in the PRT group (18.9 to 32.3) than in the RT group (1.5 to 12.9). The DJRE deteriorated with 35 in the RT group and did not change in PRT group (-2.0). CONCLUSION: In combination with resistance training, proprioceptive training led to a significantly higher muscle hypertrophy and didn't effect a significant deterioration of the proprioceptive capability compared to isolated resistance

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2013
Creators: Kramer, Michael and Hohl, Kathrin and Bockholt, Ulrich and Schneider, Florian and Dehner, Christoph
Title: Training Effects of Combined Resistance and Proprioceptive Neck Muscle Exercising
Language: English
Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: To investigate training effects of two different resistance and proprioceptive exercising concepts of neck muscles. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Twenty-six healthy women participated in a randomized pilot trial. The test persons were randomized to two different neck-training programs (resistance training (RT) and proprioceptive resistance training (PRT)). They performed a standardized training program for the duration of ten weeks two times weekly. The neck strength, the cross-sectional area of three neck muscle groups (1. sternocleidomastoid muscles; 2. multifidus and semispinalis cervicis muscles; 3. semispinalis capitis and splenius muscles) and the proprioceptive capability evaluated by the dynamic joint repositioning error (DJRE) of the head were assessed pre- and post-intervention. RESULTS: Strength gain did not differ significantly between the two resistance training groups (PRT group: 8.2 to 29.3; RT group: 1.4 to 19.8). Change of hypertrophy of all neck muscle groups was significantly (p< 0.001 to p=0.013) greater in the PRT group (18.9 to 32.3) than in the RT group (1.5 to 12.9). The DJRE deteriorated with 35 in the RT group and did not change in PRT group (-2.0). CONCLUSION: In combination with resistance training, proprioceptive training led to a significantly higher muscle hypertrophy and didn't effect a significant deterioration of the proprioceptive capability compared to isolated resistance

Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation
Journal volume: 26
Number: 2
Uncontrolled Keywords: Business Field: Visual decision support, Research Area: Human computer interaction (HCI), Virtual reality (VR), Medicine, Motion control
Divisions: 20 Department of Computer Science
20 Department of Computer Science > Interactive Graphics Systems
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2018 11:16
DOI: 10.3233/BMR-130368
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