TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Polarization reversal dynamics in polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic materials

Schultheiß, Jan Erich (2018):
Polarization reversal dynamics in polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic materials.
Darmstadt, Technische Universität, [Online-Edition: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/7752],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

Ferroelectric materials find application in numerous electronic devices and are continuously enabling the development of new technologies. Their versatility is intimately related to the unique property to switch the polarization with electric fields. However, the switching mechanisms in polycrystalline ferroelectric materials remain insufficiently understood. Several questions regarding the mechanisms of the polarization reversal process in polycrystalline ceramic materials have been addressed in this work. The dynamics of the process was measured by a self-constructed high voltage switch, which provides high voltage pulses to the sample and measures its macroscopic polarization and strain response over several decades. Moreover, this macroscopic technique was supplemented by in situ synchrotron diffraction experiments using a high speed detector at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. This unique combination of macroscopic and microscopic time-resolved experimental data allowed to reveal the sequence of events during polarization switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric materials. The process is illustrated by a sequence of well-defined 180° and non-180° domain switching events, which can be separated into three regimes. Field-dependent measurements allow to determine activation fields for the individual regimes, which are a crucial input parameter for micromechanical models. The domain structure in a poled polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic material mainly consists of non-180° domain walls. Several of them are misaligned to the poling field direction and polarization reversal can start from these misaligned domains. In the first switching regime, the non-180° domain walls are moving, driven by an external applied electric field and supported by internal mechanical fields. Auxiliary mechanical forces and the fact that nuclei are already available result in a low activation field and consequently a fast movement of the domain walls. The transition between the first and the second regime is governed by the interplay between electric and mechanical fields, which can be displayed by Landau energy landscapes. The polarization reversal in the second regime occurs by 180° or synchronized non-180° domain wall movement. Hereby, more than 60% of the total polarization was found to be switched in a model Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 material. With the experimental methods available today, it is not possible to distinguish between pure 180° or synchronized non-180° domain wall movement. However, a more than three times lower Peierls barrier for non-180° compared to 180° domain wall movement and crystallographic arguments suggest that switching in the main switching phase occurs essentially by synchronized non-180° events. In any case, the mechanical stress in this regime is acting against the moving domain walls, which is expressed by a 35% higher activation field, as compared to the first regime. In the third regime the majority of domains are reversed and the electric field is parallel to the polarization vector. Here, creep-like movement of non-180° domain walls occurs. The dynamic response of polycrystalline ceramic materials is strongly influenced by their microstructure, affecting the polarization and strain response in the individual regimes. In this context, the velocity of domain walls is set by the local electric field. The distribution of the latter in a polycrystalline ceramic material is inhomogeneous, since it represents a projection of the external electric field to the direction of the spontaneous polarization of a grain. In addition, other factors influence the dynamic response. A 47 % higher activation field was found for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 materials with a tetragonal compared to a material with a rhombohedral crystallographic structure. This partially reflects the influence of the lattice distortion and the resulting internal stresses at the domain junctions, which have to be overcome when the domain walls are moving. In addition, mechanical and electrical interaction between grains play a significant role. In this context, internal mechanical stresses may enhance or suppress domain wall movement. This is for example expressed in a broader distribution of switching times for a polycrystalline ceramic with smaller grain sizes compared to a ceramic material with larger grain sizes. On the other hand, a 20 % reduction in the activation field for polarization reversal was found for BaTiO3-based materials which are highly crystallographically textured compared to untextured materials. Tailoring the microstructure accordingly may impede or facilitate the dynamic response of the polycrystalline ceramic material. In addition, a relation between microstructural parameters and the dynamic polarization response of polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramic materials is an important input parameter for theoretical models.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2018
Creators: Schultheiß, Jan Erich
Title: Polarization reversal dynamics in polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic materials
Language: English
Abstract:

Ferroelectric materials find application in numerous electronic devices and are continuously enabling the development of new technologies. Their versatility is intimately related to the unique property to switch the polarization with electric fields. However, the switching mechanisms in polycrystalline ferroelectric materials remain insufficiently understood. Several questions regarding the mechanisms of the polarization reversal process in polycrystalline ceramic materials have been addressed in this work. The dynamics of the process was measured by a self-constructed high voltage switch, which provides high voltage pulses to the sample and measures its macroscopic polarization and strain response over several decades. Moreover, this macroscopic technique was supplemented by in situ synchrotron diffraction experiments using a high speed detector at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. This unique combination of macroscopic and microscopic time-resolved experimental data allowed to reveal the sequence of events during polarization switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric materials. The process is illustrated by a sequence of well-defined 180° and non-180° domain switching events, which can be separated into three regimes. Field-dependent measurements allow to determine activation fields for the individual regimes, which are a crucial input parameter for micromechanical models. The domain structure in a poled polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic material mainly consists of non-180° domain walls. Several of them are misaligned to the poling field direction and polarization reversal can start from these misaligned domains. In the first switching regime, the non-180° domain walls are moving, driven by an external applied electric field and supported by internal mechanical fields. Auxiliary mechanical forces and the fact that nuclei are already available result in a low activation field and consequently a fast movement of the domain walls. The transition between the first and the second regime is governed by the interplay between electric and mechanical fields, which can be displayed by Landau energy landscapes. The polarization reversal in the second regime occurs by 180° or synchronized non-180° domain wall movement. Hereby, more than 60% of the total polarization was found to be switched in a model Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 material. With the experimental methods available today, it is not possible to distinguish between pure 180° or synchronized non-180° domain wall movement. However, a more than three times lower Peierls barrier for non-180° compared to 180° domain wall movement and crystallographic arguments suggest that switching in the main switching phase occurs essentially by synchronized non-180° events. In any case, the mechanical stress in this regime is acting against the moving domain walls, which is expressed by a 35% higher activation field, as compared to the first regime. In the third regime the majority of domains are reversed and the electric field is parallel to the polarization vector. Here, creep-like movement of non-180° domain walls occurs. The dynamic response of polycrystalline ceramic materials is strongly influenced by their microstructure, affecting the polarization and strain response in the individual regimes. In this context, the velocity of domain walls is set by the local electric field. The distribution of the latter in a polycrystalline ceramic material is inhomogeneous, since it represents a projection of the external electric field to the direction of the spontaneous polarization of a grain. In addition, other factors influence the dynamic response. A 47 % higher activation field was found for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 materials with a tetragonal compared to a material with a rhombohedral crystallographic structure. This partially reflects the influence of the lattice distortion and the resulting internal stresses at the domain junctions, which have to be overcome when the domain walls are moving. In addition, mechanical and electrical interaction between grains play a significant role. In this context, internal mechanical stresses may enhance or suppress domain wall movement. This is for example expressed in a broader distribution of switching times for a polycrystalline ceramic with smaller grain sizes compared to a ceramic material with larger grain sizes. On the other hand, a 20 % reduction in the activation field for polarization reversal was found for BaTiO3-based materials which are highly crystallographically textured compared to untextured materials. Tailoring the microstructure accordingly may impede or facilitate the dynamic response of the polycrystalline ceramic material. In addition, a relation between microstructural parameters and the dynamic polarization response of polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramic materials is an important input parameter for theoretical models.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Nonmetallic-Inorganic Materials
Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2018 19:55
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/7752
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-77527
Referees: Koruza, Dr. Jurij and Wolfgang, Prof. Dr. Donner
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 9 August 2018
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Ferroelektrische Materialien werden in zahlreichen elektronischen Geräten angewendet und treiben die kontinuierliche Entwicklung neuer Technologien voran. Sie unterscheiden sich von anderen polaren Materialien dadurch, dass der Polarisationsvektor mit einem elektrischen Feld umgeschaltet werden kann. Die Mechanismen während dieses Umschaltvorgangs in polykristallinen ferroelektrischen Materialien sind jedoch nur unzureichend verstanden. Um die Sequenz des Umschaltprozesses zu entschlüsseln wurde die Dynamik des Umschaltprozesses mit einem selbstgebauten Hochspannungsschalter gemessen. Die damit erzeugten Hochspannungspulse schalten den Polarisationsvektor um, während die makroskopische Polarisations- und Dehnungsantwort der Probe zeitaufgelöst gemessen wird. Diese makroskopischen Messungen wurden mit zeitaufgelösten Beugungsexperimenten ergänzt. Hierzu wurde ein Detektor mit hoher Messgeschwindigkeit der European Synchrotron Radiation Facility verwendet. Mit Hilfe der Kombination aus zeitaufgelösten makroskopischen und mikroskopischen Daten konnte die Sequenz des Polarisationsumschaltens in polykristallinen ferroelektrischen Materialien dargestellt werden. Der Prozess wird in drei Abschnitte unterteilt, wobei das Umschalten in jedem Abschnitt durch die Bewegung von 180° oder nicht-180° Domänenwänden stattfindet. Mit Hilfe von feldabhängigen Messungen können Aktivierungsfelder für das Umschalten der Polarisation in den jeweiligen Abschnitten bestimmt werden, die eine wichtige Eingangsgröße für mikromechanische Modelle sind. Die Domänenstruktur in gepolten polykristallinen ferroelektrischen/ferroelastischen Materialien besteht zu einem Großteil aus nicht-180° Domänenwänden, von denen viele im remanenten Zustand nicht in die Richtung des Polungsfeldes ausgerichtet sind. Im ersten Abschnitt beginnt der Umschaltprozess durch die Bewegung dieser Domänenwände, stimuliert durch das externe elektrische Feld. Diese Domänenwandbewegung wird von internen mechanischen Spannungen unterstützt und ist durch eine hohe Geschwindigkeit und niedrige Aktivierungsfelder gekennzeichnet. Der Übergang vom ersten zum zweiten Abschnitt geschieht durch ein komplexes Zwischenspiel zwischen elektrischen und mechanischen Feldern, welches durch zweidimensionale Landau freie Energielandschaften beschrieben wird. Polarisationsumschalten im zweiten Abschnitt findet durch 180° oder synchronisierte nicht-180° Domänenwandbewegung statt, wobei die heute verfügbaren experimentellen Methoden keinen finalen Schluss zulassen, welche Domänenwandbewegung dominant ist. Die Tatsache, dass die Peierls Gitterenergie für nicht-180° Domänenwände dreimal geringer ist als für 180° Domänenwände und kristallographische Argumente deuten jedoch darauf hin, dass das Umschalten der Polarisation im zweiten Abschnitt hauptsächlich durch nicht-180° Domänenwandbewegung stattfindet. Der Beitrag der im zweiten Abschnitt umgeschalteten Polarisation zur gesamten umgeschalteten Polarisation wurde zu 60 % in einem Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 Modellmaterial quantifiziert. Hierbei wirkt die mechanische Spannung nun entgegen der Domänenwandbewegung. Dies hat ein um 35 % höheres Aktivierungsfeld für die Domänenwandbewegung verglichen mit dem ersten Abschnitt zur Folge. Im dritten Abschnitt ist der Polarisationsvektor der Domänen parallel zum elektrischen Feld ausgerichtet. Der dritte Bereich zeichnet sich durch eine langsame nicht-180° Domänenwandbewegung aus und die makroskopische Antwort ähnelt elektrischem Kriechen. Die dynamische Antwort eines polykristallinen ferroelektrischen Materials ist stark von dessen Mikrostruktur abhängig. Hierbei wird die Geschwindigkeit der Domänenwände von dem lokal wirkenden elektrischen Feld bestimmt. Dieses ist in einer polykristallinen Keramik inhomogen verteilt, da das externe elektrische Feld auf die Richtung der spontanen Polarisation eines einzelnen Korns projiziert wird. Neben der inhomogenen Feldverteilung wird das Schaltverhalten durch weitere Parameter beeinflusst. Zum Beispiel wurde für ein Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 mit tetragonaler Kristallstruktur ein um 47 % höheres Aktivierungsfeld verglichen mit einem Material mit einer rhombohedrischen Kristallstruktur gefunden. Dies spiegelt den Einfluss der Gitterverzerrung und die daraus resultierenden internen Spannungen an Domänentripelpunkten wieder, welche bei der Bewegung dieser Domänen überwunden werden müssen. Beim Umschalten von polykristallinen ferroelektrischen Materialien spielt außerdem die Wechselwirkung zwischen den einzelnen Körnern eine wichtige Rolle und interne mechanische Spannungen können das Umschalten verlangsamen oder beschleunigen. Zum Beispiel wird eine breitere Verteilung von Umschaltzeiten in Keramiken mit kleinerer Korngröße gefunden, während das Umschalten einfacher und die Verteilung der Umschaltzeiten mit steigender Korngröße schärfer wird. Auf der anderen Seite zeigen BaTiO3 basierte Materialien mit kristallographisch texturierten Körnern ein um 20% verringertes Aktivierungsfeld für das Umschalten der Polarisation im zweiten Abschnitt, verglichen mit Materialien, die keine Vorzugsrichtung aufweisen. Durch gezieltes Einstellen der Mikrostruktur kann das Umschalten des Polarisationsvektors zweckmäßig beeinflusst werden. Der Zusammenhang zwischen Mikrostrukturparametern und Polarisation ist außerdem für die Berechnung der dynamischen Umschaltprozesse die Basis für eine Verbesserung von theoretischen Modellen.German
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

View Item View Item