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Compact low power infrared tube furnace for in situ X-ray powder diffraction

Doran, A. and Schlicker, Lukas and Beavers, C.M. and Bhat, Shrikant and Bekheet, Maged F. and Gurlo, Aleksander (2017):
Compact low power infrared tube furnace for in situ X-ray powder diffraction.
In: Review of Scientific Instruments, American Institute of Physics, Melville, USA, pp. 013903, 88, (1), ISSN 0034-6748,
DOI: 10.1063/1.4973561,
[Online-Edition: https://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.4973561],
[Article]

Abstract

We describe the development and implementation of a compact, low power, infrared heated tube furnace for in situ powder X-ray diffraction experiments. Our silicon carbide (SiC) based furnace design exhibits outstanding thermal performance in terms of accuracy control and temperature ramping rates while simultaneously being easy to use, robust to abuse and, due to its small size and low power, producing minimal impact on surrounding equipment. Temperatures in air in excess of 1100 degrees C can be controlled at an accuracy of better than 1%, with temperature ramping rates up to 100 degrees C/s. The complete "add-in" device, minus power supply, fits in a cylindrical volume approximately 15 cm long and 6 cm in diameter and resides as close as 1 cm from other sensitive components of our experimental synchrotron endstation without adverse effects.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2017
Creators: Doran, A. and Schlicker, Lukas and Beavers, C.M. and Bhat, Shrikant and Bekheet, Maged F. and Gurlo, Aleksander
Title: Compact low power infrared tube furnace for in situ X-ray powder diffraction
Language: English
Abstract:

We describe the development and implementation of a compact, low power, infrared heated tube furnace for in situ powder X-ray diffraction experiments. Our silicon carbide (SiC) based furnace design exhibits outstanding thermal performance in terms of accuracy control and temperature ramping rates while simultaneously being easy to use, robust to abuse and, due to its small size and low power, producing minimal impact on surrounding equipment. Temperatures in air in excess of 1100 degrees C can be controlled at an accuracy of better than 1%, with temperature ramping rates up to 100 degrees C/s. The complete "add-in" device, minus power supply, fits in a cylindrical volume approximately 15 cm long and 6 cm in diameter and resides as close as 1 cm from other sensitive components of our experimental synchrotron endstation without adverse effects.

Journal or Publication Title: Review of Scientific Instruments
Volume: 88
Number: 1
Publisher: American Institute of Physics, Melville, USA
Uncontrolled Keywords: THERMAL-EXPANSION; CORUNDUM; IN2O3
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Dispersive Solids
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2018 14:17
DOI: 10.1063/1.4973561
Official URL: https://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.4973561
Funders: Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy: DE-AC02-05CH11231, COMPRES, tConsortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences under NSF: EAR 11-57758, German Research Foundation (DFG): SPP 1415, GU 992/12-1, Advanced Light Source BL12.2.2 for beam time: DD00087
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