TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Land-use responses of dung beetle communities and their ecosystem services

Frank, Kevin (2018):
Land-use responses of dung beetle communities and their ecosystem services.
Darmstadt, TUprints, Technische Universität, [Online-Edition: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/7402],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

Global urbanization and rising human population densities result in a constant need for resources and food. Land use and land cover are inevitably bound to human population dynamics and thus remain the major drivers of continuous environmental change. Agricultural land use and forestry affect species communities and consequently their ecological functions – such as nutrient cycling or protection against soil erosion – resulting in a loss of ecosystem services. Indicator species, therefore, provide valuable contributions for the observation of anthropogenic disturbance, as they respond sensitively towards changes of their habitat and living conditions. The presence or absence of such species affects the evaluation of disturbances and predictions of ecosystem changes and thus might reveal functional consequences. Detritivores (Saprobionts) utilize and process organic material, which otherwise would be inaccessible for higher trophic levels. Their unique way of recycling organic material renders them important contributors on the base of every food web. Hence, in context of agricultural land use and forestry in differing management intensities, I focused within this thesis on the occurrence, ecosystem services, community structure and behavioral patterns of a basal superfamily of insects: dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea). Dung beetles are widespread in most habitats around the globe and represent important ancient and current detritivores. These functionally important beetles are faced with a wide range of anthropogenic disturbances and changes in environmental conditions due to land use. I thus conducted quantitative surveys of the abundance of dung beetles and their dung removal rates in forest and grassland sites with varying land-use intensity, to focus on following research questions: (Q1) Does land use affect dung beetles and their ecosystem services? (Q2) In which ways do dung beetle-resource connectivity and the complexity of this trophic network respond to (rising) land-use intensity? (Q3) Do dung beetle – resource interactions change in specificity along a global, latitudinal gradient? Besides these applied and ecosystem-service related questions I found patterns and results for the beetles’ resource preference, which were discussed controversially in the literature and still remain to be fully understood. For a better and more basic understanding of this detritivorous group of insects I addressed the following questions: (Q4) Is the nutritional value of dung a driving force for dung type attractiveness and dung beetle preference? (Q5) Which roles have volatile organic compounds in dung beetle attraction? In chapter 2 I used dung from livestock and game animals to provide a characteristic spectrum of dung resources and sampled 300 experimental sites, including forests and grasslands. Since every sampling site differed in management intensity, I was able to calculate the effects of rising land-use and forest management and highlight contrary, but foremost negative effects on dung removal for both habitats. Chapter 3 is a more indepth analysis of the beetles’ community structure and the complexity of dung beetle networks. The species’ abundance and distribution across sites revealed a generalization of beetle-resource interactions, which led to more even and higher decomposition rate. Additionally, I found that a rising dung beetle network complexity translates into an enhanced robustness against land use. To test the beetles’ resource specificity on a global scale, I conducted in chapter 4 a meta-analysis of 110 dung beetle-resource interaction networks along a latitudinal gradient. Despite a significant increase of dung beetle diversity towards the equator, overall the dung beetle networks remained highly generalistic. In chapter 5 I conducted nutritional analyses (amino acids, fatty acids, sterols, C/N contents) of different dung types to unravel patterns in dung type preferences I observed in the field. Albeit differences in nutritional composition on a feeding guild level, these results did not predict patterns of dung preference. Subsequently, I analyzed volatile organic compounds of different dung types in chapter 6. Dung scent components (as described in the literature or elucidated by my own gas chromatographic measurements) were used in single and mixed baits to test for attractivity, compared to natural dung samples. Dung scent analyses revealed both, unique bouquets and ubiquitous volatiles for different dung types. This leads to specific volatile blends – including key volatiles – for the beetles’ resource localization.

In summary, this thesis contributes to applied issues regarding land use and forestry, conveys an enhanced understanding of the (global) community structure and faces issues in basic dung-beetle research. Anthropogenic disturbance, like habitat dependent management, often negatively affects ecosystem services of various taxa; also true for some responses of dung beetles i.e. the beetles’ dung removal in terms of deforestation. Yet, dung beetle communities show an unexpected robustness against land-use intensity. Due to the high generalization level of dung beetle networks, so far, a balanced dung removal is assured. Even on a global basis, this generalistic character of dung beetle-resource interactions remains similar across a latitudinal gradient. Observed resource specificity cannot be explained by (differing) nutritional values of the dung types, but certain mixtures and single (key) volatile organic compounds seem crucial for specific patterns in dung beetle attraction.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2018
Creators: Frank, Kevin
Title: Land-use responses of dung beetle communities and their ecosystem services
Language: English
Abstract:

Global urbanization and rising human population densities result in a constant need for resources and food. Land use and land cover are inevitably bound to human population dynamics and thus remain the major drivers of continuous environmental change. Agricultural land use and forestry affect species communities and consequently their ecological functions – such as nutrient cycling or protection against soil erosion – resulting in a loss of ecosystem services. Indicator species, therefore, provide valuable contributions for the observation of anthropogenic disturbance, as they respond sensitively towards changes of their habitat and living conditions. The presence or absence of such species affects the evaluation of disturbances and predictions of ecosystem changes and thus might reveal functional consequences. Detritivores (Saprobionts) utilize and process organic material, which otherwise would be inaccessible for higher trophic levels. Their unique way of recycling organic material renders them important contributors on the base of every food web. Hence, in context of agricultural land use and forestry in differing management intensities, I focused within this thesis on the occurrence, ecosystem services, community structure and behavioral patterns of a basal superfamily of insects: dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea). Dung beetles are widespread in most habitats around the globe and represent important ancient and current detritivores. These functionally important beetles are faced with a wide range of anthropogenic disturbances and changes in environmental conditions due to land use. I thus conducted quantitative surveys of the abundance of dung beetles and their dung removal rates in forest and grassland sites with varying land-use intensity, to focus on following research questions: (Q1) Does land use affect dung beetles and their ecosystem services? (Q2) In which ways do dung beetle-resource connectivity and the complexity of this trophic network respond to (rising) land-use intensity? (Q3) Do dung beetle – resource interactions change in specificity along a global, latitudinal gradient? Besides these applied and ecosystem-service related questions I found patterns and results for the beetles’ resource preference, which were discussed controversially in the literature and still remain to be fully understood. For a better and more basic understanding of this detritivorous group of insects I addressed the following questions: (Q4) Is the nutritional value of dung a driving force for dung type attractiveness and dung beetle preference? (Q5) Which roles have volatile organic compounds in dung beetle attraction? In chapter 2 I used dung from livestock and game animals to provide a characteristic spectrum of dung resources and sampled 300 experimental sites, including forests and grasslands. Since every sampling site differed in management intensity, I was able to calculate the effects of rising land-use and forest management and highlight contrary, but foremost negative effects on dung removal for both habitats. Chapter 3 is a more indepth analysis of the beetles’ community structure and the complexity of dung beetle networks. The species’ abundance and distribution across sites revealed a generalization of beetle-resource interactions, which led to more even and higher decomposition rate. Additionally, I found that a rising dung beetle network complexity translates into an enhanced robustness against land use. To test the beetles’ resource specificity on a global scale, I conducted in chapter 4 a meta-analysis of 110 dung beetle-resource interaction networks along a latitudinal gradient. Despite a significant increase of dung beetle diversity towards the equator, overall the dung beetle networks remained highly generalistic. In chapter 5 I conducted nutritional analyses (amino acids, fatty acids, sterols, C/N contents) of different dung types to unravel patterns in dung type preferences I observed in the field. Albeit differences in nutritional composition on a feeding guild level, these results did not predict patterns of dung preference. Subsequently, I analyzed volatile organic compounds of different dung types in chapter 6. Dung scent components (as described in the literature or elucidated by my own gas chromatographic measurements) were used in single and mixed baits to test for attractivity, compared to natural dung samples. Dung scent analyses revealed both, unique bouquets and ubiquitous volatiles for different dung types. This leads to specific volatile blends – including key volatiles – for the beetles’ resource localization.

In summary, this thesis contributes to applied issues regarding land use and forestry, conveys an enhanced understanding of the (global) community structure and faces issues in basic dung-beetle research. Anthropogenic disturbance, like habitat dependent management, often negatively affects ecosystem services of various taxa; also true for some responses of dung beetles i.e. the beetles’ dung removal in terms of deforestation. Yet, dung beetle communities show an unexpected robustness against land-use intensity. Due to the high generalization level of dung beetle networks, so far, a balanced dung removal is assured. Even on a global basis, this generalistic character of dung beetle-resource interactions remains similar across a latitudinal gradient. Observed resource specificity cannot be explained by (differing) nutritional values of the dung types, but certain mixtures and single (key) volatile organic compounds seem crucial for specific patterns in dung beetle attraction.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Publisher: TUprints
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology
10 Department of Biology > Ecological Networks
Date Deposited: 13 May 2018 19:55
Official URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/7402
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-74027
Referees: Blüthgen, Prof. Dr. Nico and Jürgens, Prof. Dr. Andreas
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 20 April 2018
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Die globale Besiedlung und steigende Bevölkerungsdichten verursachen einen konstanten Bedarf an Ressourcen und Nahrung. Eine großflächige Bebauung und Landnutzung sind daher unausweichlich mit menschlichen Populationsdynamiken verbunden und stellen eine der größten Triebkräfte für konstante Veränderungen in unserer Umwelt dar. Landwirtschaftliche Bodennutzung und Forstwirtschaft beeinflussen Artengemeinschaften und deren Ökosystemfunktion – wie beispielsweise die Unterstützung von Nährstoffkreisläufen oder Schutz vor Bodenerosion – was schlussendlich zu einem Verlust von Ökosystemdienstleistungen führen kann. Indikator-Spezies sind ein nützliches Hilfsmittel zur Evaluierung von anthropogen versursachten Störungen, da diese meist sehr sensibel auf Veränderungen in ihrem Habitat reagieren. Die An- oder Abwesenheit solcher Arten hilft bei der Erstellung von Modellen, die das Ausmaß von Störungen erheben und dadurch Prognosen möglicher Auswirkungen für unser Ökosystem ermöglichen. Detritivore (Saprobionten) verwenden und prozessieren organisches Material, das andernfalls für höhere trophische Ebenen kaum zugänglich wäre. Durch ihre einzigartige Nutzung und Verwertung von solch organischem Material leisten sie einen extrem wichtigen Beitrag auf den untersten Stufen der Nahrungsnetze. Aus diesem Grund habe ich mich in meiner Dissertation mit dem Vorkommen, den Ökosystemdienstleistungen, Strukturen in der Artengemeinschaft und Verhaltensmustern einer basalen Großfamilie von Insekten im Kontext von Land- und Forstwirtschaft mit unterschiedlichen Management-Intensitäten gewidmet: den Dungkäfern (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea). Dungkäfer sind weltweit in den meisten Habitaten verbreitet und repräsentieren seit dem Jura eine extrem wichtige Gruppe von Detritivoren. Durch Landnutzung sind sie einem breiten Spektrum von anthropogenen Störungen und Veränderungen in ihren Lebensräumen ausgesetzt. Daher habe ich in quantitativen Untersuchungen die Abundanz der Käfer sowie die Dung-Abbauraten im Wald und Grünland bei unterschiedlich starker Land- und Forstwirtschaft durchgeführt, um folgende Fragen zu beantworten: (Q1) Werden Dungkäfer und ihre Funktion für das Ökosystem durch Land- und Forstwirtschaft beeinflusst? (Q2) Wie wirkt sich die (steigende) Bewirtschaftung von Wäldern und Wiesen auf die Nutzung der (Dungkäfer-) Ressourcen und die daraus resultierende Komplexität dieser trophischen Netzwerke aus? (Q3) Ändert sich die Komplexität und damit die Spezialisierung der Netzwerke „Dungkäfer – Ressource“ entlang der Breitengrade? Zusätzlich zu diesen eher angewandten Fragestellungen habe ich während meiner Arbeit mit den Dungkäfern Muster in der Präferenz für bestimmte Ressourcen gefunden. Gründe hierfür werden in der Literatur noch immer kontrovers diskutiert und sind noch nicht ausreichend geklärt. Daher habe ich für ein besseres und grundlegenderes Verständnis dieser detritivoren Gruppe zusätzlich folgende Fragen bearbeitet: (Q4) Ist der Nährstoffgehalt ausschlaggebend für die Attraktivität und die Auswahl bestimmter Dungsorten? (Q5) Welche Rolle spielen volatile, organische Komponenten bei der Attraktivität von Dung und die Auswahl zwischen verschiedenen Ressourcen der Dungkäfer? In Kapitel 2 beschreibe ich die Beprobung von 300 Experimentalflächen in Wäldern und Wiesen, wobei verschiedene Dungsorten von Nutz- und Wildtieren verwendet wurden, um ein möglichst natürliches Ressourcenspektrum für Dungkäfer abzudecken. Da die einzelnen Experimentalflächen in der Intensität der Bewirtschaftung variiert haben, konnte ich den Einfluss von steigender Land- und Forstwirtschaft auf den Dungabbau in beiden Habitaten untersuchen, wobei sich teils gegenläufige aber primär negative Effekte herausgestellt haben. Kapitel 3 ist eine tiefergehende Analyse der beprobten Dungkäfergemeinschaften und deren Komplexität. Die Abundanz und Verteilung der Arten über die Versuchsflächen zeigt ein generalistisches Dungkäfer-Ressource Verhältnis, welches zu einem erhöhten und gleichmäßigerem Dungabbau führt. Zusätzlich konnte ich zeigen, dass eine erhöhte Komplexität der Dungkäfer-Ressourcen Interaktion zu einer erhöhten Resistenz gegenüber Bewirtschaftung führt. Um eine Ressourcenpräferenz der Dungkäfer auf globaler Ebene zu untersuchen, habe ich in Kapitel 4 eine Meta-Analyse mit 110 verschiedenen Interaktionsnetzwerken zwischen Dungkäfer und ihren Ressourcen entlang eines Breitengrad-Gradienten durchgeführt. Die Diversität der Dungkäfergemeinschaften nimmt zwar in Richtung des Äquators zu, die Interaktionsnetzwerke (und damit der Spezialisierungsgrad der Tiere) bleibt jedoch hoch generalistisch. In Kapitel 5 habe ich eine Nährstoffanalyse (Aminosäuren, Fettsäuren, Sterole, C/N-Verhältnis) verschiedener Dungsorten durchgeführt, um die Ursache von Dungpräferenzen zu untersuchen, die ich während der Feldversuche dokumentieren konnte. Obwohl sich die Dungsorten in ihrer Nährstoffzusammensetzung auf einem Fraßgilden-Niveau unterscheiden (Carnivore, Omnivore und Herbivore Dungproduzenten), können die Ergebnisse die Dungpräferenzen nicht vollständig erklären. Daher habe ich in Kapitel 6 verschiedene Duftkomponenten der Dungsorten verwendet (auf Literaturbasis und aus eigenen gas-chromatographischen Messungen identifiziert), um deren Attraktivität als Einzel– oder Mischköder im Vergleich zu natürlichem Dung zu testen. Eine zusätzliche Duftstoffanalyse der im Feld verwendeten Dungsorten zeigt sowohl einzigartige Bouquets als auch ubiquitäre Duftkomponenten in den einzelnen Dungsorten. Daraus lässt sich schließen, dass die Dungkäfer sowohl spezifische Duftgemische, als auch bestimmte Schlüsselkomponenten zur Suche und Auswahl ihrer Ressourcen verwenden. Die vorliegende Dissertation trägt zu einem besseren Verständnis der Auswirkungen von Land- und Forstwirtschaft bei, vermittelt tiefere Erkenntnisse über die (globalen) Strukturen der Artengemeinschaften und behandelt grundlegende Fragestellungen in Bezug auf Dungkäfer. Anthropogene Störungen wie Landnutzung haben häufig negative Auswirkungen auf die Funktion verschiedener Taxa im Ökosystem, was hier beispielsweise durch eine Beeinträchtigung des Dungabbaus durch Holzeinschlag auch für Dungkäfer bestätigt werden kann. Darüber hinaus zeigen jedoch die untersuchten Dungkäfergemeinschaften eine unerwartet hohe Toleranz gegenüber (steigender) Landnutzung. Aufgrund der generalistisch ausgeprägten Interaktionsnetzwerke kann vorerst ein gleichmäßiger Dungabbau seitens der Käfer gewährleistet werden. Der generalistische Charakter dieser Tiergruppe in Bezug auf ihre Ressourcenwahl bleibt ebenfalls global über die verschiedenen Breitengrade hinweg erhalten. Beobachtete Muster in der Auswahl und Präferierung der verschiedenen Dungsorten können zwar nicht durch eine unterschiedliche Nährstoffzusammensetzung erklärt werden, allerdings gibt eine nähere Analyse der Dunftkomponenten im Dung Hinweise auf die Nutzung bestimmter Bouquets und einzelner Volatile als Hauptfaktor oder mögliche Auslöser für eine gerichtete Ressourcenwahl bei Dungkäfern.German
Export:
Suche nach Titel in: TUfind oder in Google
Send an inquiry Send an inquiry

Options (only for editors)

View Item View Item